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Using Google Chrome (16.0.912.41 beta specifically), when I modify the parameters to the URL in the address bar, Chrome sometimes performs a Google search for the string instead of going to the URL the string represents.

For example, I use Trac on an internal network and access it through Chrome. If I'm on a track ticket at this URL: http://trac/project/ticket/1287 (the URL strips off the http and all that is visible in the URL is trac/project/ticket/1287) If I want to quickly go to a different ticket, I just change the 1287 to the ID of the new ticket. I change the 1287 to 1288 and press enter and Chrome takes me here: https://www.google.com/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=trac%2Fproject%2Fticket%2F1288 instead of going to http:// trac/project/ticket/1288, which is what I intended.

How can I tell Chrome that when the address bar contains the string "trac/project/ticket", go to that URL and do not perform a search?

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migrated from webapps.stackexchange.com Dec 13 '11 at 2:19

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First thing I would do is install the current version of Chrome. Version 16 was released yesterday. The second issue is you need to setup your internal network to not strip the http. – Ramhound Dec 14 '11 at 14:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the issue might be that your base domain (trac) doesn't look like a website domain. My guess is that you are on some internal network. I would try using the fully qualified domain (i.e. trac.yourinternaldomain.com/project/ticket/1288).

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This answer fixes my issue of Chrome sometimes thinking my string is a URL and other times a search term. Thanks! – TheGeneral Dec 19 '11 at 19:52

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