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I'm looking for some tool that, given a zip/rar/tar/* archive file, mounts it as a new Windows drive. Some tools are WinMount or WinArchive, but I need one that allows me to write/create/delete files as well as read. That is, just as if it were a USB stick or something like that. The file doesn't need to be compressed, just archived is fine. Thanks a lot!

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I don't know if such software exists, but for must compression and archiving methods; removing or changing any part of any file will take at least as long as creating a new archive from scratch. – Eroen Dec 13 '11 at 15:56
    
It doesn't need to be compressed, just archived is fine. – caerolus Dec 13 '11 at 16:00
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Could you use a virtual disk, for example a VHD ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VHD_(file_format) )? Should be supported natively in windows 7. – Eroen Dec 13 '11 at 16:08
    
Yes! didn't know these were supported natively by Windows 7. The problem was having to synchronize tens of thousands of files between machines..so I figured having them in a single file would be easier. Thank you! – caerolus Dec 13 '11 at 16:29
    
@Eroen Still, if there was a way of doing this with zip, rar, tar or whatever, it'd be great in terms of portability and ease of use. – caerolus Dec 13 '11 at 16:50

Try Pismo File Mount. Its freeware, supports zip, and ISO, but not .rar

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Thanks. This one is free and works great – Patrick Wolf Sep 29 '14 at 18:39

There are a few utilties out there that can do this, but I use this one:

Win Archiver Virtual Drive

Essentially, you can mount any supported type of archive (zip, rar, 7z, iso, etc), to any # of drives you want, and they act just like regular drive.

Quite useful:

Win Archive Virtual Drive

The image above shows drive K -> O; drive K is actually a mounted RAR file for a .NET project :)

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