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I'm using gnome terminal, and vim with solarized color theme. When I open vim in the terminal, it's illegible.

vim opened in the terminal

But when I open a file in gvim, the color scheme works perfectly.

gvim

Gnome terminal's color scheme is also solarized. One thing to note is that, if I set an illegal value for background, I get the expected background color (but also an error).

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Could you add your .vimrc and .gvimrc? –  Pedro Nascimento Dec 21 '11 at 22:18
    
.vimrc is here there's no .gvimrc. I already checked the question on the 1st comment. My &term and $TERM are both the same (xterm-256color). –  yasith Dec 21 '11 at 23:59
1  
Found a temporary fix, adding this before colorscheme solarized. Changes the colors to the solarized theme. But, the line numbers column keeps having a brownish-grey color. –  yasith Dec 22 '11 at 0:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To complete Akira's advice, vim in term mode uses the terminal color palette. From the vim solarized colorscheme repo :

If you are going to use Solarized in Terminal mode (i.e. not in a GUI version like gvim or macvim), please please please consider setting your terminal emulator's colorscheme to used the Solarized palette. I've included palettes for some popular terminal emulator as well as Xdefaults in the official Solarized download available from Solarized homepage.

For gnome-term, there are instructions to set up the color palette.

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Had the same problem today, when trying to setup a new system, and after setting the colors in ~/.Xresources and merging using xrdb. The color problems with vim in terminal session is gone. –  yasith Aug 19 '12 at 0:30
    
Useful gconf code block to set up gnome-terminal: xorcode.com/2011/04/11/solarized-vim-eclipse-ubuntu –  artfulrobot Feb 28 '13 at 23:21

vim use the power of your "terminal" to draw the characters onto the screen. thus, how the drawn chars look depend largely on what the "terminal" is capable of. the "terminal" uses an enviroment variable to tell the apps running inside it about its capabilities: TERM.

if you want to use vim to use 256 colors you need 2 things:

  • a terminal capable of rendering at least 256 colors
  • the right TERM variable (xterm-256color)

so, try this:

$ export TERM=xterm-256color
$ vim

also read up more upon the topic on http://vim.wikia.com/wiki/256_colors_in_vim

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By running this commmand, I was able to use the vim extension Powerline in my gnome-terminal. Thank you! –  Yamaneko Mar 11 '13 at 17:59

Referencing: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/66579/how-do-i-get-the-solarized-colour-scheme-working-with-gnome-terminal-tmux-and-v/141624#141624

I give the same response here: According to Koraktors comment, executeing :set t_Co=16 fixed the mixed colors issue immediately for me, so I added it to ~/.vimrc to sustain the correction.

You really don't want to enable the 256 colors, it actually decrease the how close you can get to the solarized pallette. From the devs website:

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR TERMINAL USERS:

If you are going to use Solarized in Terminal mode (i.e. not in a GUI version like gvim or macvim), please please please consider setting your terminal emulator’s colorscheme to used the Solarized palette. I’ve included palettes for some popular terminal emulator as well as Xdefaults in the official Solarized download available from Solarized homepage. If you use Solarized without these colors, Solarized will need to be told to degrade its colorscheme to a set compatible with the limited 256 terminal palette (whereas by using the terminal’s 16 ansi color values, you can set the correct, specific values for the Solarized palette).

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Workaround for the grey number background color:

Open solarized.vim, search for LineNr, remove the line.

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