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A HTTPS server I'm browsing uses an invalid certificate. I want my machine to ignore this error and think that the certificate is valid. How to do that?

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Disabling certificates is not a solution. You're leaving yourself open to expired certificates, an attacker trying to intercept communications and/or tampering with your internet connection. It is better to accept the invalid certificate only if you know and trust as to why this is happening. –  kobaltz Jan 2 '12 at 20:13
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@kobaltz I don't want to disable all certificate checking, just this one –  Jader Dias Jan 2 '12 at 20:15
    
correct, see my answer below. –  kobaltz Jan 2 '12 at 20:17

1 Answer 1

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It will depend on each browser. Your server has a certificate, but each browser will display that this certificate was generated by an unknown authority.

Personally, I run a private cloud which is accessible only within my network. I know that it communicates with a secure connection and that the certificate was self generated by the server. Knowing this, I know that my connection is still encrypted but is not authorized/verified with a known agent. I will always get these errors.

However, it is not a good idea to disable the error/warning as that is no different than removing your Check Engine light bulb. Hides the problem but does not solve your root issue.

Firefox: enter image description here

This part will allow you to add the exception for the certificate and not display this information again while keeping the connection secured.

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enter image description here

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I know this, I don't want to simply avoid this message. I want the machine to trust the invalid certificate. –  Jader Dias Jan 2 '12 at 20:14
    
If you use Firefox, it will install the certificate as described above. –  kobaltz Jan 2 '12 at 20:22

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