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I have a Macbook Air, which can get hot when the core i5 inside ramps up (using Turbo Boost). I thought I'd make a geektool script to show me what speed the processor is currently at, and put it on my desktop. Unfortunately, it isn't as easy as finding the same information on my android phone.

Does anyone know a way to find the current processor speed through the shell (whether OSX specific or Unix/BSD, it may work here).

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use sysctl hw.cpufrequency. Its output is in Hz, e.g.:

hw.cpufrequency: 2660000000

hw.cpufrequency_min and hw.cpufrequency_max contain the minimum and maximum values, respectively.

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How is it possible to do this any quicker on a mobile phone's command line? This is way more to type with more than 2.5x the number of characters. –  Daniel Beck Jan 10 '12 at 19:19
    
I never said it was quicker--it was easier because I knew where it was. –  semisight Jan 10 '12 at 21:45
    
@sem if that's the only reason it's really not. Maybe for you, specifically, but as you can see, a one-liner can change that pretty quickly. There's no value in that part of your question... –  Daniel Beck Jan 10 '12 at 22:09
    
I mean, technically, there was no value to any part of my question except the question itself. It just feels so wrong to post one line questions... I do see your point. Sorry for the confusion. –  semisight Jan 10 '12 at 23:15
    
@semisight I was just wondering about that. The rest of the question is useful though. If it weren't possible out of the box from the command line, some plugin or module for Geektool would probably work for you as well. –  Daniel Beck Jan 11 '12 at 14:26

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