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What computer file contains windows kernel?

is it seen in task manager process list?

if not, why?

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Are you doing homework? –  Daniel Beck Jan 12 '12 at 15:58
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You need to leave out the space between the @ and the name, otherwise notifications don't work. Like this: @DanielBeck –  slhck Jan 12 '12 at 16:32
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I was just wondering. Your question could have been copied straight from a homework assignment of a computer class the way it's worded. // Regarding notifications, just check whether it autocompletes after typing e.g. @D // Thanks for the ping @slhck –  Daniel Beck Jan 12 '12 at 16:35
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The kernel is not in the process list because it is not a process. (By way of dodgy analogy, when hosting a party you don't usually put yourself on the guest list.) –  Harry Johnston Jan 13 '12 at 2:39
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up vote 7 down vote accepted

What you're looking for in modern versions of Windows is ntoskrnl.exe. I don't believe it shows up in Task Manager as a running process, though.

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Or ntkrnlpa.exe if PAE is enabled. :) –  techie007 Jan 12 '12 at 16:24
    
@techie007 - I learned something here today, thanks! –  Shinrai Jan 12 '12 at 17:16
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It indeed does not show up as a process, because it isn't. Processes, as shown in Task Manager, are running in "user space" as opposed to "kernel space". Naturally, the kernel itself runs in kernel space. –  MSalters Jan 13 '12 at 12:41
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The Windows Kernel is not just a single file. It's the core of the operating system, and relies on several files in order to function. It is not seen as a task in the task manager... because it is what organizes those tasks.

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