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I am using 2 computers: 1 personal laptop (Linux) and 1 work desktop (WinXP). I use Thunderbird on both computers to fetch email from my GMail account. I haven't been using this email client for very long but I was expecting that when I read an email from my work desktop, it would automatically sync (or update) the email on my personal laptop from "unread" to "read".

What happens is that I read an email from my work desktop and when I get home I open my personal laptop, the email I read from the office is still unread at home. I was expecting that IMAP will sync the status of the message (read,unread) once I read an email from either one of my Thunderbird instances.

How do I set it up so that its behavior will be as I want above.

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I have around five different IMAP clients accessing the same IMAP store, and any action taken by any client is inherently reflected to all other clients, due to the nature of IMAP - it is a single store, and so something that is flagged as read/unread in IMAP should be seen to be read in any client. –  Paul Jan 13 '12 at 4:46
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Usually IMAP will auto sync read/unread, folder add/remove provide that you have IMAP setup correctly. I have more than one computer with Thunderbird + Gmail. when I read mails in one PC; upon opening Thunderbird on another PC, it auto sync my read mails immediately. Does your Thunderbird auto check new mail each time you start up? Maybe try clicking send/receive to force it to check. Since you said that you haven't use it very long time, maybe there is a huge amount of mails that have to be synced, consider giving it sometime to sync.

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Ok. I will try this when I get back home later today. –  riclags Jan 13 '12 at 6:23
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