Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some internet radio stations which I can listen to inside a browser; but to play them in media players like VLC I need the URL of the actual audio stream. How can I get my browser (chrome or firefox) to tell me what that URL is?

I can't find the URL because it is not encoded on the webpage, but rather calculated by external javascript. I suppose I could snarf down that java script, and try to decypher it, but that sounds very painful, when my browser knows the answer all along.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use something like Firebug to monitor the connections the browser makes, and capture the URL there.

share|improve this answer
    
I had an idea that Firebug might be come to the rescue here, but I am a complete nOOb with it. Can you help me with how to "monitor the connections"? –  Adrian Ratnapala Jan 17 '12 at 5:14
1  
Switch to the "Net" tab, then read. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 17 '12 at 5:15
add comment

You can use Wireshark to capture traffic on your network card, and filter for any requests to URLs.

Use the following in the filter bar:

http.request

This will show only HTTP requests, one of which will be the stream being accessed.

It is possible that some streams will use the RTMP protocol for the stream, so you may want to look for this using the following filter:

rtmpt
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I am installing wireshark as I type, but it seems over the top. The browser knows the answer, it should just tell me. –  Adrian Ratnapala Jan 17 '12 at 5:18
1  
Yes, but some (often it seems these days) online streams use flash, so the browser won't necessarily have visibility. Try the firebug approach first... –  Paul Jan 17 '12 at 5:32
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.