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Modification of files with 777 permissions but not with 755 permissions?

In Unix , we have a file permissions which can be changed with chmod command . But applying the permissions are always confusable for beginners . If anyone can explain it with the simple terms , would be very useful.

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Closed as duplicate since the answer points to the duplicate –  Diago Sep 9 '09 at 10:25
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marked as duplicate by Diago Sep 9 '09 at 10:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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I gave a somewhat detailed explanation here. This page is also very in depth, I recommend you give it a read.

Now that I think about it, a permissions calculator was the first program I made with a GUI. I'll try to find it.

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i made already one desktop.google.com/plugins/i/unixchmod_cumakt.html?hl=en –  ukanth Sep 9 '09 at 3:25
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Nice, a gadget too! Mines a bit smaller :) rapidshare.com/files/277520186/Permissions.7z brings back memories. –  John T Sep 9 '09 at 3:52
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@John T This seems to be some sort of ".exe" file. file reports it is for something called "MS Windows". –  Richard Hoskins Sep 9 '09 at 4:51
    
Yeah any GUI programs I made when starting out were for Windows. I didn't know much about toolkits like Qt and programming even a simple "Hello World" for X was a painstaking process. –  John T Sep 9 '09 at 5:01
    
Your answer on that previous question pretty much sums this question up as a dupe. –  random Sep 9 '09 at 6:41
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Use the famous Online CHMOD Calculator, it works great and is VERY interactive:

http://www.onlineconversion.com/html%5Fchmod%5Fcalculator.htm

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The Wikipedia reference is quite brief and simple.
It also has some references at the bottom.

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