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I would like to store my passwords locally in a way similar to what Supergenpass does: using a master password mix a domain name example.com with a username exampleuser and generate a unique password for each domain/username pair.

(As for now Supergenpass does not take username into account).

Does something like that exist for Linux platform?

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SuperGenPass works just fine under Linux. All that's required is a Javascript-capable browser.

Alternatively, you can make your own. All SuperGenPass does is return the MD5 hash for the domain+master password, cut to the specified length. You can do basically the same thing from most shells:

user@example:~$ echo "helloworld123"|md5sum|cut -c -10
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Yes, but it generates passwords from domain name. What if I need to store a password from a door lock? Supergenpass is a nice tool, but it is only for website-one-user usage. –  Martin Lee Jan 27 '12 at 10:15
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All SuperGenPass does is return the MD5 hash for the domain+master password, cut to the specified length. You can do basically the same thing from most shells: user@example:~$ echo "helloworld123"|md5sum|cut -c -10 –  Andrew Lambert Jan 27 '12 at 19:23
    
Also, you can manually specify the "domain" that SuperGenPass uses by open the Regenerate Password link and entering whatever you want for the domain. –  Andrew Lambert Jan 27 '12 at 19:29
    
Thanks for the shell example! Does 'echo "helloworld123"|md5sum|cut -c -10' generate exactly the same result on any shell and any machine? –  Martin Lee Feb 1 '12 at 10:03
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Provided the input, "helloworld123" is exactly the same, then the output will be the same too, always. –  Andrew Lambert Feb 1 '12 at 17:40

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