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There is a video I downloaded while watching YouTube.

I would like to convert it to an AVI, then burn it to a DVD so I can watch it on a big screen TV.

I noticed that when I go to full screen mode, the picture does not look so great. Will the same thing happen playing it on a TV?

Is there any way to fix that?

I'm using Ubuntu 10.10 so I only have what the Linux community has at my disposal.

I don't know anything about video technology. I'm wondering if televisions work differently than computer monitors such that the video will look good on a television, whereas it will not in full screen mode on a computer monitor.

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Yes. I don't know anything about video technology. I'm wondering if televisions work differently than computer monitors such that the video will look good on a television, whereas it will not in full screen mode on a computer monitor. –  user787832 Jan 26 '12 at 14:12
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The worst thing you can do to a video is compressing it again. By doing so, you take a video that already misses data, and remove additional data from it. What you'll get is called generation loss and in most cases it won't look good.

For example, your video could go from this:

enter image description here

To this (exaggerated):

enter image description here

If you burn a video to a Video DVD (i.e. one that runs in a DVD player), and it's not yet encoded as MPEG-2 (it most likely isn't), you will encode it again. This means that the video itself will probably look worse than the original. Also, DVDs have restrictions in terms of video dimensions. You'll therefore probably need to re-scale your video so that it fits. This is also not very beneficial to the quality.

Therefore: Don't re-encode unless you have to.


TVs are different from computer monitors in terms of image adjustment. Computer monitors should only show exactly what they receive as input whereas TVs may apply color and contrast correction to the signals they receive. This might be called "True Color" or some other marketing name for generally just something that makes the picture "look better".

Sometimes, they might try to reduce blocking artifacts, sharpen edges, increase contrast and saturation, et cetera. In some cases, these optimizations will make a video look better, even when you blow it up full screen.

Other factors include the type of TV. If it's an analogue CRT TV, the quality will not look as bad as with digital Plasma or LED TVs, as they will better reproduce spatial details.

Therefore, I would assume that your video will look a bit better on a recent TV – probably even better if this TV has certain enhancement technologies enabled. I would however not be too sure of this. It heavily depends on the type of content you have and your viewing setup (e.g. distance from your TV, ambient light, etc.)

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