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I recently purchased a Verizon mobile hotspot (MiFi 4510L) and was wondering if I could configure my Linksys wireless/wired router (similar, but not the exact model: Linksys router) to use the MiFi as the source of internet.

The problem is that I want to give internet access to a desktop that doesn't have an internal or an external Wi-Fi transceiver.

Right now, I'm using two comnputers - one is a Dell Latitude 2100 netbook, and it is capable of connecting to both routers and configuring them. I have it connected to the Verizon mobile hotspot via Wi-Fi and to the Linksys via wired ethernet.

I know that both routers work - I've been using the Verizon mobile hotspot for a couple days on both 3G & 4G networks without any problems. I've been using the Linksys wired/wireless router for a long time now as well.

Is there a way to force the Linksys to receive it's internet uplink from the Verizon mobile hotspot? I was looking through all the settings of the Linksys admin page, but don't really know what option(s) would have to be tweaked in order to complete this task.

If you are wondering why I am trying to use the Linksys router at all, it is for two reasons: First, the linksys has wired connections - this is a critical requirement as my desktop computer does not have any Wi-Fi antennae. Second, the MiFi 4510L DHCP only allows for 10 nodes (+/1 2).

This problem wouldn't exist if the MiFi 4510L had an ethernet port, but it doesn't. The only buttons/connections it has are for: charging and for device reset. I've checked the battery compartment for anything also.

I don't want to buy an USB Wi-Fi transceiver if I don't have to, so is there any way, via configuration/manipulation of software, hardware, or both, that would allow my Linksys router to obtain it's internet uplink wirelessly from my Verizon modem?

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migrated from serverfault.com Feb 1 '12 at 8:39

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3 Answers 3

I'm doing something similar, check out this link.

Lifehacker - Turn Your $60 Router into a User-Friendly Super-Router with Tomato

You have to upgrade your routers firmware with either dd-wrt or tomato (your choice). Once you've done that, you can turn your router into a wireless repeater or let it connect to your network and act as a regular router! Then just connect your computer to the router with your regular ethernet cable.

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The image of the Linksys does not identify the model, but most Linksys models do not include WiFi client functionality - which is what is needed for it to connect to a WiFi network. Some Linksys models can be "modified" with non-Linksys firmware which enable them to have WiFi client functionality.

USB WiFi adapters/dongles can be found for around $20 or less these days.

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thanks for the info... can you elaborate on the first half of your answer? most Linksys models do not include WiFi client functionality - which is what is needed for it to connect to a WiFi network I don't fully understand what is necessary when trying to force the linksys to act as an access point to the verizon internet source –  CheeseConQueso Sep 5 '11 at 7:51
    
oh, btw, i know the picture doesn't match - i made a note of that in the question. It's basically the same, though, it has 4 wired ports and also support wifi connections –  CheeseConQueso Sep 5 '11 at 8:08
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Most SOHO NAT routers (which is a majority of the Linksys product line) are designed strictly to work with a wired WAN connection. A small number can act as repeaters/extenders/clients when their functionality includes the ability for the unit to connect to a WiFi network - versus create a WiFi network. –  user48838 Sep 5 '11 at 8:54

Get your laptop connected, then change the Ethernet port on your laptop to a VPN. Set it to share the network connection with other computers, then plug it to your WAN port – and there it is.

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It would be great if you could expand your answer and gave a step-by-step instruction of how to do that! –  slhck Aug 26 '12 at 9:44
    
i agree... sounds very promising... thanks –  CheeseConQueso Nov 2 '12 at 18:37

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