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I have a Windows 7 (Home Premium if that matters) box witch I want to set up a SMB share on for a network media player to play videos from. Ideally I would like this to be open so it can be copied into from any computer on the network (both MacOS and Linux).

Following this http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-7/share-files-and-printers-between-windows-7-and-xp/ I've chosen the option to "Turn on sharing so anyone with network access can read and write files in the Public folders.". However when I try to write to smb://winbox/videos/ (assuming that is the Public Video folder) on Linux it gives me a Permission denied (Linux can read the files).

How to I set up an smb share on Windows 7 that can be written to by Linux/MacOS?

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1 Answer 1

One thing the guide you linked to forgot to mention was permissions on the shared folder. Right click the folder you're sharing, then go to:

Properties > Sharing > Advanced Sharing > Permissions > Add > "Anonymous Logon" > Check Names > OK > Check Full Control > Apply > OK > Apply > OK > Close.

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I still have a "failed to connect" message when attempting to connect with MacOSX... –  Martin Delille Mar 5 '13 at 8:36
    
I seem to remember reading about a bug in OSX's implementation that always tries to use your login information even when you select to use anonymous login. I will see if I can find the article. –  Huckle Mar 7 '13 at 19:14
    
@tinmaru Actually I think I was thinking of a Windows bug because I can't find the article now. Try to use the form smb://username@IPAddress/shareName to ensure that the correct username is used. (It will be your window's username) –  Huckle Mar 7 '13 at 19:25

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