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I have a 3D printer hooked up to a business class network. For some reason I found that I can ping any word and get a response from a specific ip address (always the same number). The printer's interface is hosted via web browser. I can get to it through cross over cable. Setting a static ip address doesn't do anything. Ideally I'm looking to use DHCP (other 3D printers don't have a problem).

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Don't suggest contacting the manufacturer because they don't know enough IT to be helpful (and I already have). Why can I ping any word and get a response?


Update:

C:\>nslookup cake
Server:  resolver1.opendns.com
Address:  208.67.222.222

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:    cake.wp.comcast.net
Address:  67.215.65.132

C:\>nslookup
Default Server:  resolver1.opendns.com
Address:  208.67.222.222

> set d2
> cake
Server:  resolver1.opendns.com
Address:  208.67.222.222

------------
SendRequest(), len 37
    HEADER:
        opcode = QUERY, id = 2, rcode = NOERROR
        header flags:  query, want recursion
        questions = 1,  answers = 0,  authority records = 0,  additional = 0

    QUESTIONS:
        cake.wp.comcast.net, type = A, class = IN

------------
------------
Got answer (53 bytes):
    HEADER:
        opcode = QUERY, id = 2, rcode = NOERROR
        header flags:  response, want recursion, recursion avail.
        questions = 1,  answers = 1,  authority records = 0,  additional = 0

    QUESTIONS:
        cake.wp.comcast.net, type = A, class = IN
    ANSWERS:
    ->  cake.wp.comcast.net
        type = A, class = IN, dlen = 4
        internet address = 67.215.65.132
        ttl = 0 (0 secs)

------------
Non-authoritative answer:
------------
SendRequest(), len 37
    HEADER:
        opcode = QUERY, id = 3, rcode = NOERROR
        header flags:  query, want recursion
        questions = 1,  answers = 0,  authority records = 0,  additional = 0

    QUESTIONS:
        cake.wp.comcast.net, type = AAAA, class = IN

------------
------------
Got answer (37 bytes):
    HEADER:
        opcode = QUERY, id = 3, rcode = NOERROR
        header flags:  response, want recursion, recursion avail.
        questions = 1,  answers = 0,  authority records = 0,  additional = 0

    QUESTIONS:
        cake.wp.comcast.net, type = AAAA, class = IN

------------
Name:    cake.wp.comcast.net
Address:  67.215.65.132
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Where are you pinging from, printer's web interface? –  Rado Feb 17 '12 at 14:59
    
ping from a computer on the LAN. –  Kyle Parisi Feb 17 '12 at 15:13
1  
Then this has nothing to do with the printer it just makes everything confusing. Your dns is probably resolving the address. I use opendns and if it cannot resolve a URL, it redirects to its search page which normally be all from the same ip address –  Rado Feb 17 '12 at 15:15
1  
You are correct I get an open dns site result. How might I fix this resolve issue? –  Kyle Parisi Feb 17 '12 at 15:37

3 Answers 3

Perhaps, because your resolver finds a wildcard "A" record.

You could update your question with details of where you typed the ping command (e.g. from a Command-Prompt on a Windows-7 desktop PC). A cut&paste of what is returned by nslookup cake might be helpful.


If your printer has an Ethernet interface and you are connecting a PC to it via a crossover patch cable, the printer will be unable to find a DHCP server since it's LAN consists of itself and your PC only (you didn't mention anything about using a PC as a bridge between LAN segments for example, nor did you mention using the same PC as a DHCP server). Normally you would configure the printer to pick up an address by DHCP and (if appropriate) set a reservation in the DHCP server. The DHCP server should be configured to provide the printer with an appropriate IP-address plus the IP_address of the default gateway in it's LAN segment and the IP-address of one or more DNS servers. You can use an Ethernet hub (not switch) and A PC with something like Wireshark to monitor DHCP requests and responses as the printer is powered up.


Update

Try this

C:\>nslookup cake
Server:  nameserver.mysite.example.com
Address:  192.168.0.5

*** nameserver.mysite.example.com can't find cake: Non-existent domain

Then this

C:\>nslookup
Default Server:  nameserver.mysite.example.com
Address:  192.168.0.5

> set d2
> cake
Server:  nameserver.mysite.example.com
Address:  192.168.0.5

------------
SendRequest(), len 22
    HEADER:
        opcode = QUERY, id = 2, rcode = NOERROR
        header flags:  query, want recursion
        questions = 1,  answers = 0,  authority records = 0,  additional = 0

    QUESTIONS:
        cake, type = A, class = IN

------------
------------
Got answer (97 bytes):
    HEADER:
        opcode = QUERY, id = 2, rcode = NXDOMAIN
        header flags:  response, want recursion, recursion avail.
        questions = 1,  answers = 0,  authority records = 1,  additional = 0

    QUESTIONS:
        cake, type = A, class = IN
    AUTHORITY RECORDS:
    ->  (root)
        type = SOA, class = IN, dlen = 64
        ttl = 10615 (2 hours 56 mins 55 secs)
        primary name server = a.root-servers.net
        responsible mail addr = nstld.verisign-grs.com
        serial  = 2012021700
        refresh = 1800 (30 mins)
        retry   = 900 (15 mins)
        expire  = 604800 (7 days)
        default TTL = 86400 (1 day)

------------
*** nameserver.mysite.example.com can't find cake: Non-existent domain

Can you enter the above commands (nslookup then set d2 then cake then exit) and paste the results into your question?


Update 2

From the additional info you added in your update to your Q, it seems clear that

  1. Your PC's resolver is using wp.comcast.net as a default domain. This gets added to any query that doesn't end in a "." (the lack of which means it may not be a fully qualified domain name FQDN). It is most likely your router that is instructing your PC to do this via settings issued via DHCP. You can verify this using the command ipconfig /all and observing the info:

    Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : wp.comcast.net

  2. Your DNS service provider is hijacking "No such domain" responses in order to direct your web-browser to a web site where your DNS provider can sell your eyeballs to advertisers. They disregard the drive-by collateral damage this does to DNS lookups for anything that isn't HTTP (like your pings).

The solution (to your PC problem with "cake") is to use FQDNs and, ideally, to change your DNS service. Or just understand it and live with it.

As others have said, whatever printer problems you have are probably unrelated to this.

share|improve this answer
    
from cmd on windows 7 PC. I also have tried connecting via browser and the manufacturer tried to VNC to the printer with no luck. –  Kyle Parisi Feb 17 '12 at 15:35
    
@Kyle: See updated answer –  RedGrittyBrick Feb 17 '12 at 15:49
    
See above update –  Kyle Parisi Feb 17 '12 at 21:40

That is because you use OpenDNS.

OpenDNS opens a search page when you type a non-resolvable domain name in your address bar, as a feature. They call it typo-correction. You can disable this in the OpenDNS settings when you have an OpenDNS network account.

Using an other DNS server also fixes this of course.

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PING

Do you know what device has the IP address that keeps coming back? You could check your internal DNS server (or router) and see what machine has that IP address.

or if it's a computer you can find it's name by using this command from a command cmd prompt (where ipaddress is the ipaddress that comes back when you ping "cake").

nbtstat –a ipaddress

This way you can figure out what is up with that machine. I have seen two machines recently with wome spyware that promotes that machine to Domain Controller and takes over DHCP for the network. I used ipconfig /all and determined the ip address of the DHCP server wasn't the server.

Printer

Follow the instructions that came with the printer to reset it to it's defaults (which will most likely be DHCP. Connect it to your switch (or hub, router, etc.) with a straight through cable. Boot it up. Print out the configuration sheet, which should have it's IP address. Log on to that IP address.

If you print the config sheet show's a 169.254.x.x IP address. Manually set your computer to a different 169.254.x.x address on the same subnet as shown in the config print out. Then hookup your crossover cable and type in the printers 169.254 address and manually configure it. Remember that after you change it's ip address, you have to change yours to see it again.

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