Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Many webhosts etc want you to upload files using ftp or sftp. Yet I always found that scp is faster and simple works better (more like the local cp command).

What are the advantages ftp has to offer over scp? Or what other reason is there to choose ftp over scp, at least from a webhosts perspective?

I ask this because I recently set up my own webserver and have now got acces to all configuration options.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If it's your own server, stay with scp.

Hosting companies just offer FTP because it's more widely adopted and more people know how to use it (compared to SSH).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but most servers even block out scp and ssh. Why is that? –  romeovs Feb 23 '12 at 11:45
    
Maybe the host provider doesn't want to support it. I'd say SSH/SCP is a more complex topic than just FTP. If you want to provide SCP without a shell, you need to set up rssh or scponly or something. It can get complicated fast enough. –  Oliver Salzburg Feb 23 '12 at 11:54
    
@romeovs: They don't want to provide a shell. As long as they provide SFTP that's ok, if they don't then ditch them. –  Optimal Cynic Feb 23 '12 at 11:59
add comment

Most of web related people know about the FTP but it not same in case of SCP. If its your own server then using SCP is fine, but if you need to give anyone else some access to upload files in portion of server, FTP is best option then, as you can't handle full control via SSH.

Also for shared hosting accounts they only give ftp access, so that end user have limited access, not the control of full server.

With FTP some third party will just add/remove files at most but SCP access in wrong hands will do no good at all.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.