Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

I have users who remotely log into a terminal server over the Internet.

They need the ability to synchronize their local drive (mapped through RDP settings) with their "user" drive on the terminal server. I think the screenshot below will best explain this requirement.

Can someone please make a recommendation on how this sync could be best achieved?

Many thanks!

RDP Sync

share|improve this question

Windows 7 has a built-in utility called Sync Center. Essentially what the user would need to do is right-click on the network folder or drive that they want to keep synced, and click "Always available offline" - then you can go into Sync Center and manage the syncing.

share|improve this answer
    
Can Sync Center sync two separate hard drives (as shown in my screenshot) while logged in to a Windows Server 2008 terminal server? Right-clicking on a drive didn't show "Always available offline". – Ash Feb 29 '12 at 8:50
    
Not sure about the drive. Seems like there should be an option related to keeping the drive available "offline". As an alternative, you could create a BAT script with Robocopy sync commands that automatically runs at certain times (i.e. on bootup, shutdown, etc.) – Joshua Feb 29 '12 at 16:05
    
The problem is that the drive mapped through RDP always has a different path name e.g. "H on Alex-PC", "H on Tim-PC". If RDP had a consistent name for the drives a script would make it easy. – Ash Mar 1 '12 at 9:02
    
@Ash If you go by UNC path instead if the descriptive name there is a standard naming scheme. It is always \\tsclient\DriveLetter\ , so both of your previous examples would translate to \\tsclient\H\ – Scott Chamberlain Mar 13 '14 at 3:58

I did not want to use Sync Center, as I did not want to "sync" my files. I'm a developer, and the files I needed from the local machine are source files. So I found this blog entry (http://blog.ryankempt.com/2012/09/windows-library-add-non-indexed-location.html), and implemented the details of option #4, and now I have direct access to my local files through my remote desktop connection. Remember in the RDC setup options to make the local drive available to the RDC session.

share|improve this answer
    
I know this was an old post, but someone else might blunder upon this post while looking up how to do this. – Paul Dec 18 '15 at 22:19
    
So how do you do it? Link-only answers are frowned upon (probably because they're useless when (not if) the link goes down) – Xen2050 Dec 18 '15 at 22:46

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .