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I have a machine with Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition, SP2. The hard-drive is in NTFS format. I am sharing a folder from this machine.

I would like to know if a limit exists for:

  • the size of a shared folder
  • how many files can exist in a shared folder

For example, I have this folder structure, where Root_folder is shared:

\Root_folder
    \Child_folder

I need to how to limit the size of Child_folder. (I don’t use File Server Resource Manager for quota managment.)

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I need to how to limit the size of Child_folder. (I don’t use File Server Resource Manager for quota managment.)

There is no way of doing this without using quotas that FSRM offers or buying a third party tool (there used to be several, but these days, most people just use Windows built in capabilities).

Is there a reason you don't want to use them?

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Thank u for explanation...so I will use FSRM – arva Feb 28 '12 at 21:04

The maximum size a single file on an NTFS volume can have is 16TB.

No matter what arbitrary limit you assume to be the maximum number of files in a single folder (hint: It's actually 4,294,967,295), I'm pretty sure you'll hit your storage limit (or the NTFS volume size limit) way before that.

I don't know of any additional limitations that could be imposed by the SMB protocol.

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