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Does Windows provide a means to check my CPU temperature natively?

If not, are there any software tools which can reveal this information?

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I'm sure somebody's going to vote to close this as a duplicate, but while I found a bunch of questions asking what software to use I didn't actually find any specifically asking "Can Windows do this on its own?" which I think is novel enough to a potential searcher to keep. –  Shinrai Feb 29 '12 at 19:16
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An anonymous user tried to add to the question by asking whether there is a way to find the temperature from the command-line. That’s a good question, but they should ask it as a separate question. –  Synetech Nov 29 '13 at 16:41
    
PowerShell can access WMI info that includes temp if the manufacturer exposes it (and you run PowerShell as Administrator). I have a script on my blog to do so: ammonsonline.com/is-it-hot-in-here-or-is-it-just-my-cpu or just the script itself as GitHub Gist: gist.github.com/jeffa00/9577816. Good if you want something you can script yourself rather than downloading an app. –  jeffa00 Mar 16 at 15:28
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8 Answers 8

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Actually this information is given to OS by the BIOS, but you will need an application to expose the information. You can find a lot of applications to do this, Google found these:

  1. Realtemp.
  2. CPU thermomether.
  3. Core temp.
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CoreTemp is nice, but beware of InstallIQ crap (installs toolbars/ads in browser) when downloading CoreTemp, use the standalone version. –  Aleix Mercader Dec 11 '13 at 14:33
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There is no builtin Windows utility to do this, so you need to use another tool.

My personal favorite is SpeedFan. SpeedFan can monitor CPU temps, GPU temps, S.M.A.R.T. data, HD temps, and more; and if you want to you can also adjust fan speeds with it too.

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SpeedFan is very powerful, but it's very clunky IMO. I don't like it even for serious technical use. The interface is just so awful! –  Shinrai Mar 27 '12 at 14:27
    
sadly the download site now doesn't actually give you the program but a load of malware/adware/crap/junk instead. –  jwenting May 20 '13 at 17:31
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@jwenting: Don't click on the large green button that says "Start Download", but scroll down to the Download section and click on the direct link to the executable... eg. "The latest version is SpeedFan 4.49" –  w3d Sep 28 '13 at 21:28
    
It crashed my Win 8 OS immediatelly –  Pavel K Mar 13 at 8:27
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Windows doesn't expose this information out of the box - you need to install any of a myriad of tools to find it. (For something lightweight, I like Open Hardware Monitor.)

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Technically, Windows does have access, but you will need an application to expose the information. Windows just doesn't have a built-in tool to show it to the user. –  Ben Richards Feb 29 '12 at 19:17
    
@sidran32 - It's a valid point, I probably should have chosen my verbiage more carefully. Slight edit incoming. –  Shinrai Feb 29 '12 at 19:18
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You might want to take a look at HWMonitor, which shows a wide variety of system sensors.

In addition to temperature, it also shows system voltages, fan speeds, and power consumption - not only for your CPU, but all the hardware connected to your computer that has sensors (including your graphics cards and hard drives).

For a more "advanced" tool (showing much more information), you may want to use HWiNFO.

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This one is the most decent one in this thread –  shoosh Jul 17 '13 at 20:46
    
@shoosh Agreed, though do be careful to click the right download link to avoid adware. –  Lea Hayes Apr 1 at 19:57
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* 1st note that I have only used NVIDIA System Monitor and have no user-knowledge of other tool software for this purpose.

If your PC has a NVIDIA graphics card, or installed monitor software, their System Monitor tool is available at Nvidia dot com. IT IS AMAZING !!! Add the program to your desktop and you can open the program and instantly know cpu, gpu, and disc temps, as well as memory % in-use, vital multi-core cpu % in-use for each, net data transfer speed and identifies cpu clocking speeds and more. It also shows fan speeds and allows you to change their settings from auto to manual control easily (I use this feature as a temp spike preventive on hot Summer days). I physically clean the inside of my pc more often since using this program to record a 30* cpu avg. temp drop after a good cleaning.

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No, there is no native windows 7 method to monitor temperature, a third party utility is required. Coverage of all temperature sensors (cpu, graphics, motherboard, hd) woule be ideal.

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I use BatteryCare. It shows the CPU as well as Hard Disk temperature with a simple UI. It has some really awesome features if you are using it on a Laptop. To clear some myths about batteries please read this article.

I have also installed SpeedFan but rarely do I use it. It is pretty complicated to use plus risky if you don't know what you are doing.

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Windows does not provide the necessary tools for monitoring your CPU temperature.

For third party applications I recommend Core Temp, it displays the current, minimum and maximum temperature for every core. It also includes an "always on top" mode or it can display the current temperature from your system tray.

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protected by slhck Jan 7 at 13:00

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