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My Acer AS7750G-6662 has an LP173WD1(TL)(A3) 1600x900 screen, and I was considering upgrading to 1920x1200. It looks like the video card should support that resolution.

I got help to determine a suitable screen, LP173WF1(TL)(B1), but I was told that sometimes video cables only support the resolution of the original screen. That seems to jive with this previous answer.

What is the best way to determine if the existing cable will work? If it needs replacement, how can I determine which cable would be suitable?

Thanks.

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How did you determine the upgrade screen was suitable for your computer? –  MrDaniel Mar 2 '12 at 21:29
    
The support staff at laptopscreen.com gave me advice on the upgrade screen. They are also the ones that warned me about the cable. –  David Ruttka Mar 2 '12 at 21:44
    
I've done business with laptopscreen.com and they know what they're doing. Whatever they tell you to do, that's what I would do! –  Dave Becker Mar 2 '12 at 23:00
    
It depends where the LCD controller is - or rather, what the actual cable itself is transmitting (a DVI signal, or vendor-specific hardware controls)? Also, that answer you linked to states that the cable from the mainboard to the LCD is pretty much the same as a standard VGA/DVI cable, in which case it should support said resolution. –  Breakthrough Mar 2 '12 at 23:35
    
@DaveBecker Agreed. They told me to confirm with Acer that the video cable would support 1920x1200, but Acer is not cooperating. –  David Ruttka Mar 5 '12 at 14:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1600 x 900 is a dual-link resolution

upgrading to 1080p should not require a cable. (17.3" screens don't come in 1200p, they are 16:9 aspect ratio not 16:10)

Best recommended screen for your laptop is definitely LP173WF1(TL)(B1) (LG, Matte, 1080p)

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Good point about the height being 1080, not 1200. Somehow I got 1200 in my head and it stuck with me. –  David Ruttka Mar 5 '12 at 21:35

You should be fine in that situation, since standard DVI and VGA pin outs should support that resolution for the internal display. Now if you were going beyond 1920x1200 then there might be a case where a different ribbon cable might be needed. Such as a dual link DVI kind of situation but that would be a display resolution of 2560 x 1600 to need that kind of cable assuming the internal ribbon cable is DVI. However it might not be safe to assume the internal cables are using a standardized interface akin to their desktop counterparts.

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3  
A lot of internal display connectors use proprietary formats though. –  nhinkle Mar 2 '12 at 21:22
    
@nhinkle - That's a good point to take (although it's probably still a standard SIGNAL). –  Shinrai Mar 2 '12 at 21:25
    
Thanks for the quick answer and following discussion. When you say it might not be safe to assume the internal cables use a standard interface, do you think there's enough risk to hold off on the upgrade? Or is there something I could look at to confirm? Sorry if this should be obvious, but I'm more of a software guy. –  David Ruttka Mar 2 '12 at 22:42
    
I would just make sure that the replacement display is designed to work with your laptop make and model. Which seems to be the case. Aka the comments are about only going on just the physical size and dimensions of a screen while paying no regard to what that display was designed to be used in, could be dangerous. It looks like laptopscreen.com should be giving you accurate information and that they are telling you a good display that should work with your computer. –  MrDaniel Mar 2 '12 at 22:47
    
@MrDaniel Thanks for the additional clarification. I think I'll give it a shot. –  David Ruttka Mar 5 '12 at 14:43

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