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I have a PC with Windows XP SP3, a 250GB HD (C,D,E,F drives) and 1GB RAM. XP got corrupted while working on the internet (happened 3 times this week), so I am going for a dual boot.

If I install another OS on the D drive, will I be able to use the rest of the Windows drives (C,E,F) using this OS?

Note: I formatted my PC, installed Windows XP on the C drive, the rest of the drives are empty and I will install a new OS on any of these.

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2 Answers 2

My advice is create free space in your Extended Partition and Install LinuxMint in that free space.

LinuxMint is user friendly and based on Ubuntu, so support as many softwares as Ubuntu can.

And it will auto mount your other partitions under /media

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If I install other OS on D drive, will I be able to use the rest window drives(C,E,F) using this OS ?

Yes, you just need to mount them using the mount command. Linux does not organize drives the way windows does, drives are typically mounted under /mnt but you have the ability to specify any path.

As a distribution, Ubuntu is very popular and easy to use.

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is it necessary to mount the drive while they are empty or can it be done even if there is data(without affecting the data) Also can you give me any link where step by step installation information is given for dual boot and suggest the most stable version of ubuntu –  livinggourmand Mar 7 '12 at 16:19
    
You can mount a drive at any time... with mount you're telling the operating system how to access, read from, and write to the drive. You'll want to set up a bootloader. Grub and Lilo are popular. In either scenario you'll typically install Linux on the primary bootable drive, have windows on some other drive or partition, and configure the bootloader so it knows where the kernel images for each of the operating systems are. Here's an article on Grub: linuxjournal.com/article/4622 –  ubuntuguy Mar 9 '12 at 4:09
    
I tried to install ubuntu-10.04-desktop-i386. While booting from live cd I checked GParted and details confused me. As I recently formatted my PC after moving all data to other internal HD, you can see all partitions are empty. Now I have to install ubuntu on D partition. But I see a partition extended 172 GB which I actually don't have. How should I proceed? Also, when I clicked on Windows partitions they appeared on the desktop. Is this mounting? –  livinggourmand Mar 10 '12 at 8:45
    
@ubuntuguy I tried to install ubuntu-10.04-desktop-i386. While booting from live cd I checked GParted and details confused me. As I recently formatted my PC after moving all data to other internal HD, you can see all partitions are empty. Now I have to install ubuntu on D partition. But I see a partition extended 172 GB which I actually don't have. How should I proceed? Also, when I clicked on Windows partitions they appeared on the desktop. Is this mounting? –  livinggourmand Mar 10 '12 at 10:18

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