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If I set Google Music Manager to scan iTunes, it reports that there are 3997 songs (which is also indicated if I were to open iTunes and look at my collection). However, if set Google Music Manager to scan My Music folder, it detects 3999 songs.

I even deleted all of my songs from iTunes and reimported my My Music folder. iTunes is still reporting 3997 songs.

Is there an easy way to find out what is causing the difference between the two counts? I could probably add all of my songs to a playlist, export the playlist into a text or XML file using iTunes, and compare that list against everything in My Music folder to see if iTunes is missing music. However, I was wondering if anyone could shed some light on this before I did that...

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IIRC iTunes doesn't accept/recognize .wma and other similar formats. My guess is you have two such files and GM recognizes them whereas iTunes doesn't. –  Garrett Mar 21 '12 at 23:32
    
@Garrett I thought about that when I was away, after I posted this. All of my music should be MP3, so is there a good way to search in Windows for all files in My Music and subdirectories that aren't MP3 files? –  Thomas Owens Mar 21 '12 at 23:40
    
@Garrett If you want to post that as an answer, I'd love to give you some rep for helping me get the rest of the way there. That was just the kick in the right direction I needed. I posted my full solution as an answer, but I do want to at least upvote you. –  Thomas Owens Mar 21 '12 at 23:57
    
Done, glad that set you on the right track! :) –  Garrett Mar 22 '12 at 15:00
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2 Answers

IIRC iTunes doesn't accept/recognize .wma and other similar formats. My guess is you have two such files and GM recognizes them whereas iTunes doesn't.

You could fashion a search string to find dissimilar files, or use Explorer to sort by file type.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using Garrett's advice from the comments, coupled with the answer to another question here on SuperUser, I managed to find two songs that weren't in MP3 format like the rest of my collection (it actually appears that I converted them from M4A in iTunes, but never deleted the M4A version of the file).

Using the question I linked to, I built this command line search string:

dir /s /b /a-d | findstr /v /r ".*\.mp3" | findstr /v /r ".*\.jpg" | findstr /v /r ".*\.ini" | findstr /v /r ".*\.itc2" | findstr /v /r ".*\.xml" | findstr /v /r ".*\.MP3" | findstr /v /r ".*\.itdb" | findstr /v /r ".*\.plist" | findstr /v /r ".*\.itl"

Most of these are iTunes related database and metadata files, along with MP3 (which is what my collection is in). If you have other media types supported by Google Music, you might have to edit this search to also eliminate those from the results.

Anyway, When I ran this, three files came up. Two were M4As and one was in iTunes/sentinel (I'm guessing it's an extensionless iTunes file of some kind). I eliminated the M4As and all was well with the world.

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