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I have a static noise coming from my headphones when no music/noise is being played on the computer (running Windows 7).

I have tested with 3 pairs of headphones using Realtek High Definition Audio 6.0.1.6196. When there is a noise output, the fuzziness stops.

What could be causing it?

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there is a noise output, the fuzziness stops - please elaborate, you measured stops or just don't hear low-level pickups? –  Lazy Badger Mar 24 '12 at 5:26
    
Ok, so when there is any audio output from the OS, the noise disappears. A good test is the test under Advanced in Headphone Properties - clicking this provides half a second of silence, then the example noise is played completely clear, then once its finished the "fuzziness" begins again –  rickyduck Mar 26 '12 at 10:49
    
You can try to test with another (preferable Hi-Fi level) sound-card. Your card or badly designed or (more probably) poorly assembled –  Lazy Badger Mar 26 '12 at 10:59
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2 Answers

Seems like you need a ferrite choke(those strange lumps you find on random cables). Google it. The removable ones are hard to find, but they do exist.

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can you add a link or two explaining how this solution should help? –  Lizz Mar 21 '13 at 5:46
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It could be leakage of electrical noise - the cables behave as an antenna and pick pick up stray electromagnetic signals.I've had electrical noise leak into a pair of headphones plugged into a desktop (in my case, a dell inspiron 530). Its less static, than something that sounds vaguely like the sound you get when a handphone gets a text near speakers

There's not much you can do about it, except maybe somehow shield the cables in question.

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Sorry, you never knew or forgot radiophysics and radio engineering. I'm laughing through my tears on lamer's (future) upvote(s). I'll not downvote you, but, please, do not disgrace yourself and revoke your answer –  Lazy Badger Mar 24 '12 at 5:17
    
In the case of noise, captured in a short antenna with the such level of the signal intensity of the electromagnetic field would be shown a much better and earlier - hair loss and other signs of the impact of power HF-waves –  Lazy Badger Mar 24 '12 at 5:23
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Well, it does sound similar to what a induction coil mic picks up from the average piece of electronics.In addition, its a VERY short distance between the source, and whatever is picking up. Feel free to post a scientifically accurate, presumably cited answer. –  Journeyman Geek Mar 24 '12 at 5:29
    
I feel free to ignore this request - I don't want to answer, I only, with all due respect, show you some your mistakes... See difference?! –  Lazy Badger Mar 24 '12 at 6:55
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