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Differences between LCD with PIVOT and without PIVOT are only possibility to rotation and detection of this rotation?

Or I just buy LCD without PIVOT + LCD holder with rotation and using graphic card setting for rotation screen and I will have same result like LCD with PIVOT?

UPDATE: I planning buy second LCD to my 24" and I want to use in vertical position, but I think PIVOT is wasting my money, when I will not rotate LCD with every day.

I mean LCD and holder with VESA standart.

My nVidia has support for rotating screen.

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5 Answers

yes on both accounts :)

although not all pivoting monitors come with a sensor to auto-detect rotation.

you may find EeeRotate very handy. it will not only rotate the display but also your mouse/touchpad. although written for the Eee PC, it works with any other computer.

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One thing to note with running an LCD monitor at 90 degrees is that font rendering can be a problem if you prefer ClearType and similar technologies.

Sub-pixel rendering tends to assume that the subpixels are arrange horizontally, which they are in just about all modern LCD displays. This means that when you rotate the monitor (and tell your graphics card to adjust accordingly) your screen no longer matches the assumptions made by the font smoothing tech resulting in anything from "not working quite as well" to "looking god awful".

I have my old 20" in landscape (it didn't pivot itself but has a removable stand and mounting for a wall/desk arm, to I just attached it to a wall arm landscape) along side the newer 23" and the best compromise I've found in Windows is to have ClearType on but on its lightest setting. Though as usual with font rendering, these things can be very subjective.

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Actually, when LCDs nowadays claim they come with Pivot function, it just means that their mounting allows them to pivot - it does not entails auto-detection of pivoting or anything of the such.

So, your second assumption (question?) will be right - you can just buy an LCD and a mount with rotation, and it is exactly the same as LCD with PIVOT functions. And vice versa. :)

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Actually several vendors have software pivot features not just a base that pivots. You can do either MicTech I would look into the features you actually want if your video card supports changing the view angle and not base it of the pivot feature.

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Insure that you have a decent viewing angle on your pivoted portrait display!

I have a Dell 2001FP and it is beautiful in portrait mode. A dell 1905FP is also pretty good (though lower resolution).

The newer Dell 20" widescreen display I received can rotate into portrait mode but is almost unusuable as the viewing angle is horrible.

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If you're shopping for a monitor online look for one with a VA/IPS panel instead of the more common and cheaper TN to get good viewing angles when rotated. If the specs don't mention the panel type (common) look at the claimed viewing angles. The actual numbers don't correspond to anything realistic; but you can ID panel type from them. TN panels are typically rated as 160/170*, VA as 176*, and IPS as 178*. –  Dan Neely May 9 '12 at 13:33
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