Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I find myself often writing shell scripts in Linux and losing track of them over time. What I would love is a program that stores a copy of the script, along with a descriptive note I write at the time. (Preferably NOT a change management program... I've already thought of using SVN... see commentary below.)

Does anyone know of a program that does this well?

Also, I often would like to share my none-proprietary scripts with the community and get feedback (or if they're good help other people out). I find StackOverflow and related sites tend to frown on non-question posts. What would be the proper forum/site for this kind of exchange? Suggestions?

Commentary on using svn for this:
I know I could create some sort of version controlled repository, but I really generally only have a couple of revisions, so robust change management isn't very important to me. I'd much rather have robust SEARCH that let's me find scripts that might fulfill the idea I'm working on or be similar.

Of course if you really, really think svn is my best solution, feel free to answer with an explanation why, and what modifications you would suggest (svn clients, etc.) to meet my needs.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You already mentioned svn. Even if you're not using the change management features much, source control is absolutely the way to go here. If you don't like svn, try setting up git or mercurial, both of which will allow you to keep your repository locally, without the need to connect to a server. You should also be able to search the commit messages.

share|improve this answer
    
I recommend Mercurial with TortoiseHg as it is user-friendly. :) –  iglvzx Apr 13 '12 at 18:27
    
Is there any sort of ability to put "keywords" with an svn check in? I've never seen that... I'd like some sort of organizer program that uses keywords. E.g. I could search networking, and then know it's not just some stray word in the title, that it's a meaningful description of the script... –  Jason R. Mick Apr 14 '12 at 4:46
    
See here: pointbeing.net/weblog/2009/06/… –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 14 '12 at 15:22
    
Also here: freecode.com/projects/supose –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 14 '12 at 15:24
add comment

Using descriptive filenames and adding descriptive comments within scripts has generally proven helpful in my own quest to similarly keep mine organized.

share|improve this answer
    
Always a good suggestion... I just find that my scripts tend to get lost in a mess of files, as I often make them in an impromptu spirit in folders.... –  Jason R. Mick Apr 14 '12 at 4:47
1  
grep -R is your friend. –  ultrasawblade Apr 14 '12 at 13:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.