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The path for every new instance of the shell starts in my user directory (C:\Users\user).

Within this directory or rather drive (in this case C:) I can't use the cd command as I'm used to - it only echoes the specified directory.

As soon as I change the directory to a parent-directory I can execute "cd D:" and it changes to the drive.

But this behavious doesn't appear consistently in all instances of the shell.

Sometimes I have to go to C: to change it.

I'm quite sure I'm not using the command in the wrong way, since it's what I'm used to do to start grails.

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Apr 14 '12 at 21:44

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To switch to another drive, just use that drive letter. The command D: switches to the D-drive. To change to another directory, say, the root of D:, you'll need two commands:

D:
cd D:\
(or)
D:
cd \

The Windows shell has an active directory for each drive/volume. If you specify the drive letter, you change the active directory for that volume, but you will not actually make that volume active too.

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AAAh im so dumb. thanks for the clarification. Read the help entry of the command and with your comment I finally found my mistake. –  Zobbl Apr 14 '12 at 16:21

cd with just a drive only shows the current directory on that drive. Either pass the drive itself as a command to switch to its current directory (d:), or use cd /d to switch both drive and directory.

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Further testing led me to a more specific problem. I edited the question. In addition I'm trying to change the directory like D:\somefolder and just the drive. –  Zobbl Apr 14 '12 at 16:14

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