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Have a slight licencing query i've been asked about and i'm not 100% on the advice i'm about to give...

Scenario: A clock-card machine running some software that makes it available to other people on the network.

Are we right in thinking this machine would need to be running Windows Server as it's acting as a 'Server' of sorts? Or would we be ok with a Workstation OS (XP/Windows 7) as the machine wouldn't be used for anything else?

We have Windows client machines here with 4 Ubuntu servers setup with samba on a workgroup. Multiple machines of different ages (some still using Windows 2000) and the last thing we want to do is get caught out for breaking the EULA. Ideally we don't want a Windows server (as we'd need to buy several packs of CALs), but the software in question only works in a Windows enviroment (sigh!).

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Well, the primary reason windows workstation won't do well as a server is restricted connections, and hardware.

Its not the EULA proper, but this simplified version might be of use - the relevant part being "Device Connections. You may permit a maximum of five (5) computers or other electronic devices (each a "Device") to connect to the Workstation Computer to utilize one or more of the following services of the Software: File Services, Print Services, Internet Information Services, and remote access (including connection sharing and telephony services). The five connection maximum includes any indirect connections made through "multiplexing" or other software or hardware which pools or aggregates connections. This five connection maximum does not apply to any other uses of the Software."

If you're running any other services, in theory you should be fine - since this counts as "other use of the software"

As always, you might want to check with the relevant EULA of the SKU you're using to check if there's any changes. This may change depending on HOW the software is accessed, for example over remote access.

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Looks like we'd be going for XP Pro which has this in it's EULA: You may permit a maximum of ten (10) ("Connection Maximum") computers or other electronic devices (each a “Device”) to connect to the COMPUTER to utilize the services of the SOFTWARE solely for File and Print services, Internet Information services, and remote access (including connection sharing and telephony services). The ten (10) Connection Maximum includes any indirect connections made through “multiplexing” or other software or hardware which pools or aggregates connections. –  HaydnWVN Apr 18 '12 at 15:07
    
Also mentioned is: Note, however, that any software, documentation, or web services that are included in the SOFTWARE, or accessible via the SOFTWARE, and are accompanied by their own license agreements or terms of use are governed by such agreements rather than this EULA. Which leads me back to whatever the 'service' used for the 'database' (SQL/IIS) so more (and different) EULA's depending on the version used. –  HaydnWVN Apr 18 '12 at 15:09
    
Your answer helped me though, as it looks like it's back to the individual EULA's rather than the OS :) –  HaydnWVN Apr 18 '12 at 15:10
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