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Say if we get a PC desktop or notebook next time, we can partition right away so that if we need to install Windows 8 Consumer Review 32 bit, 64 bit, and install Windows 8 both 32 bit and 64 when they release, it will be ready. (or even keep 2 more partitions ready for installing Ubuntu).

What is a good way to go about doing that?


Some more details:

Most hard drive come with two primary partitions already, one for C:, and one for Factory / Restore Image, so there can be only two more primary partitions only. Should we use these two, or create one extended partition and then we can create 5 or 6 logical partitions within the extended partitions and those 5, 6 logical partition can be used to install different versions of Windows 8? Does an extended partition count as one of the primary partitions? (because we are limited to 4 maximum).

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You seem to be asking 4 or 5 questions. Stick with one, and run with it. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 24 '12 at 4:13
    
I asked 1 question 5 hours ago. It got answered. And now I asked two questions. These two questions are unrelated. That's it –  動靜能量 Apr 24 '12 at 4:14
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"How should I partition my drive for multiple Windows 8 installations?" "Does an extended partition count as a primary partition?" "Can Windows 8 boot off a logical partition?" "Can multiple Windows 8 installations boot off separate logical partitions?" –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 24 '12 at 4:18
    
I see what you mean... these are related concepts... I can put them into separate questions, but they may seem weird as another person may say "why do you care whether extended partition count as primary or not?". I am sure other people face the same issue: how do they go about partitioning after they got a new computer. –  動靜能量 Apr 24 '12 at 4:21
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Ugh, I'm having multiboot flashbacks to the late 90s. Sure you can't use VMs? –  ckhan Apr 24 '12 at 8:19

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