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This seems like a candidate for someone posting a lmgtfy link as an answer, but I don't trust the info I'm finding.

I've got a Linux box that's been whirring away in my loft for quite some time, and I thought I'd check if the CPU was x64 compatible.

I've run cpuid on the system, and the key information it reports is

 eax in    eax      ebx      ecx      edx
00000000 00000005 756e6547 6c65746e 49656e69
00000001 00000f43 00020800 0000649d bfebfbff
00000002 605b5001 00000000 00000000 007d7040
00000003 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000004 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000005 00000040 00000040 00000000 00000000
80000000 80000008 00000000 00000000 00000000
80000001 00000000 00000000 00000000 20100000
80000002 20202020 20202020 20202020 6e492020
80000003 286c6574 50202952 69746e65 52286d75
80000004 20342029 20555043 30302e33 007a4847
80000005 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
80000006 00000000 00000000 08006040 00000000
80000007 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
80000008 00003024 00000000 00000000 00000000
Vendor ID: "GenuineIntel"; CPUID level 5
Intel-specific functions:
Version 00000f43:
Type 0 - Original OEM
Family 15 - Pentium 4
Extended family 0
Model 4 -
Stepping 3
Reserved 0
Extended brand string: "              Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz"
CLFLUSH instruction cache line size: 8
Hyper threading siblings: 2
(snip Feature flag descriptions - feature flags are listed in next code block though)
TLB and cache info:
50: Instruction TLB: 4KB and 2MB or 4MB pages, 64 entries
5b: Data TLB: 4KB and 4MB pages, 64 entries
60: unknown TLB/cache descriptor
40: No 2nd-level cache, or if 2nd-level cache exists, no 3rd-level cache
70: Trace cache: 12K-micro-op, 4-way set assoc
7d: unknown TLB/cache descriptor
Processor serial: 0000-0F43-0000-0000-0000-0000

I believe the version 0F43 is represented by Family 15 (0F), Model 4, Stepping 3, which according to this, it's a 64bit Intel Xeon 3GHz CPU, but if it was a Xeon CPU, wouldn't this fact be reflected in the brand string above like the output given here?

Can anyone suggest what exactly my CPU is?

The full output from cat /proc/cpuinfo is below:

processor       : 1
vendor_id       : GenuineIntel
cpu family      : 15
model           : 4
model name      : Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz
stepping        : 3
cpu MHz         : 3000.000
cache size      : 2048 KB
physical id     : 0
siblings        : 2
core id         : 0
cpu cores       : 1
apicid          : 1
initial apicid  : 1
fdiv_bug        : no
hlt_bug         : no
f00f_bug        : no
coma_bug        : no
fpu             : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level     : 5
wp              : yes
flags           : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe nx lm constant_tsc pebs bts pni dtes64 monitor ds_cpl est cid cx16 xtpr
bogomips        : 5985.86
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 128
address sizes   : 36 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

Update 1:

By adding -xeon to my Google query, I find this which suggests it's a Pentium 4 630. Is this correct?

Update 2:

dmesg reveals a 945G chipset motherboard, which isn't a xeon board, so I'm pretty sure it's a Pentium 4 630.

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You should read this: world.std.com/~swmcd/steven/tech/cpu.html –  Oliver Salzburg May 2 '12 at 19:39
1  
@OliverSalzburg Please provide more information. That article just explains how to use the CPUID to identify the model, and the user here already did, but expected a different result. –  Daniel Beck May 2 '12 at 19:48
    
What is the output of cpuid -i? –  Ariel May 2 '12 at 19:52
1  
@OliverSalzburg, thanks, I already had that link open, but the Intel Processor Spec finder that is key to the instructions on that page is no longer available. –  Bryan May 2 '12 at 19:53
1  
@Bryan: It was moved to ark.intel.com (which you already found). I'd assume this is the best information you could get. –  Oliver Salzburg May 2 '12 at 20:08
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Putting some of your filter data into ark.intel.com reveals the following candiates:

  • 64-bit Intel® Xeon® Processor 3.00 GHz, 2M Cache, 800 MHz FSB
  • Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor 631 supporting HT Technology (2M Cache, 3.00 GHz, 800 MHz FSB)
  • Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor 630 supporting HT Technology (2M Cache, 3.00 GHz, 800 MHz FSB)
  • 64-bit Intel® Xeon® Processor 3.00E GHz, 2M Cache, 800 MHz FSB
  • 64-bit Intel® Xeon® Processor 3.00 GHz, 1M Cache, 667 MHz FSB

Maybe you're able to filter it down further?

But one thing is for sure, all candidates seem to be 64bit processors. So at least you have certainty on that part :)

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks, using that link I was able to narrow it down to being either a P4 630 or 631. Given that I'd suspected it was a 630, I'm pretty sure it's that one. As you state, all x64, which is what I really wanted to know. –  Bryan May 2 '12 at 20:25
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If you want to know if your CPU support x86_64 just test this

grep 'flags' /proc/cpuinfo  | grep 'lm' && echo "x64" || echo "x32"
x32

I ran this line on HP Compaq dc7100 Convertible Minitower PC ? which is use pretty similar Intel CPU 32bit see :

http://rzr.online.fr/q/hp

you can also get some info using dmidecode or lshw ...

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