Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

Browsing the last command's results in Bash is a bit hard because the command prompt and results are the same color. This makes it hard to separate the results of consecutive commands.

How do I change the color to pink for example?

share|improve this question
1  
You'll want to add color to the PS1 variable. – Rob May 8 '12 at 17:34
    
Yes, my current PS1 is PS1='\u:\w\$ ' which I do not know what does mean. How should I change it to colorize command prompt to pink with out loosing current settings? – Yasser Zamani May 8 '12 at 17:40
up vote 5 down vote accepted

@Rob is right; specifically, to change to light red (pink is not an available color):

PS1 = "\[\033[1;31m\]\u:\w\$\[\033[0m\] "
#      ^^^^^^^     ^^                    Begin/end ANSI escape
#             ^^^^^                      "light red foreground"
#                    ^^^^^^^             Your original prompt
#                           ^^^^^^^^^^^  Reset color back to default foreground

You need to use ANSI escape sequences (in this case 1;31m, the code for "light red foreground") which are enclosed by \[\033[ and \].

Edit: Light purple may be closer to your desired color; the PS1 change is left as an exercise for the reader.

reference @ the linux documentation project

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not great with ansi codes, so I left the answer to someone else. – Rob May 8 '12 at 21:53
    
Thanks a lot @alex-hirzel, it worked! – Yasser Zamani May 9 '12 at 15:08
    
ANSI escape sequences begin with \033 and go up to (including) m. The surrounding \[ and \] are bash-specific and are required so that bash can keep track of where the cursor is (it expects anything inside these markers not to advance the cursor). – egmont Apr 25 '15 at 22:45

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .