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How to know one single pixel RGB and transparency values precisely in Photoshop? Using eyedropper tools I seem not to be able to do that, i.e. it shows RGB=(0,0,0) on partially transparent pixels ("all layers" is selected in options).

My image has layer options like shadows and glowing and transparent areas.

EDIT 1

Probably the reason is because I use layer effects?

enter image description here

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Set the Eyedropper tool to Point Sample, and Sample All Layers:

enter image description here

Then set the Info panel to show RGB on one side and Opacity on the other:
(this is done by clicking the icon in each section to open a menu)

enter image description here

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Hm, it does not work for me. It still shows zeros over shadow. –  Suzan Cioc May 18 '12 at 17:39
    
@Suzan can you see the checkerboard background behind the shadow, or is there some kind of fill? –  Mr.Wizard May 19 '12 at 7:05
    
Yes I see checker board –  Suzan Cioc May 19 '12 at 7:52
    
@Suzan could you upload a small sample file where you're having this problem? It is working for me; I would like to confirm that it works for me on your file. –  Mr.Wizard May 19 '12 at 7:57
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@Suzan thanks to the file and your updated question I think I understand now. Photoshop is correct to display (0,0,0) at that point, as that is your Drop Shadow color. If you change the Drop Shadow color to red for example, you should see (255,0,0). Presumably however you want different information. The Opacity field as shown in my answer above will give you the density of the shadow. If you want a composite color, you will need to provide some background to composite with (perhaps a solid white fill). –  Mr.Wizard May 19 '12 at 8:32
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