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I don't know the full path to a folder, just the folder name. I would like to find everywhere where this folder is using CMD. Is there a command that does this?

I am looking for an equivalent to *nix's:

find . -name <folder name> -type d

Is there anything like that in Windows CMD? I know dir /s ...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

So at the root of the drive:

dir <Folder Name> /AD /s
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/A- Displays files with specified attributes. D-May the attribute be Directories /s - Displays files in specified directory and all subdirectories. –  nanospeck Jun 26 at 2:15
  1. switch to the root-search-folder (e.g. C:)
  2. type dir /S /P <file or foldername> (/P pauses after each screenful of information)

If you'd like a list of all occurances of a specific filename, you can simply redirect the output to a file:

dir /S <filename> > c:\results.txt

You can also narrow down your results by using the /A switch of the dir command. If you'd like to only list directories, you can append /AD to your command:

dir /S /P <filename> /AD

Other possibilities are:

 /A          Displays files with specified attributes.
 attributes   D  Directories                R  Read-only files
              H  Hidden files               A  Files ready for archiving
              S  System files               I  Not content indexed files
              L  Reparse Points             -  Prefix meaning not

If you'd like to know more about the dir command, just type dir /?into your cmd.

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Thanks very much for all the info and rolling edits =) –  BlackSheep May 23 '12 at 20:07
    
np, maybe worth an upvote? ;) –  wullxz May 23 '12 at 20:19
    
Definitely worth it, but my rep isn't high enough on this sub-SOF hahaha –  BlackSheep May 23 '12 at 20:24

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