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I sometimes have to use Windows command line tools like netsh, route or ipconfig.

Is there a place where all the Windows administration command line tools are listed?

Of course, there is MSDN for that, but it is for their documentation, I did not find a kind of page with the list of all these commands.

What would be also nice is the description of the GUI equivalent of these tools, or whether there is no GUI equivalent to these tools.

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closed as not a real question by DragonLord, 8088, Paul, Diogo, Nifle Jul 23 '12 at 16:13

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List all the tools? That might be difficult... –  Mehrdad May 29 '12 at 7:18
    
Only those bundled with Windows (NOT cygwin and so on). Aren't there any list of them? Even by category? –  Vincent Hiribarren May 29 '12 at 7:21
    
I don't know -- but the problem is, not every tool is included in Windows. A lot of "administration" tools have to be downloaded separately (e.g. ImageX), so the question is, how do you limit the scope of this... –  Mehrdad May 29 '12 at 7:23
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does this help SS.64 - ss64.com/nt –  mic84 May 29 '12 at 7:25
    
I limit the scope of it to those bundled with Windows (let's say, Windows 7). If some others are very interesting and provided by Microsoft, I am also interested. But no "third party" tools. –  Vincent Hiribarren May 29 '12 at 7:26

3 Answers 3

Here's a couple. I'm assuming you want commands other than simple file management commands like dir, attrib, etc. Others can add. There's more commands often used on the server versions of Windows and the "Resource Kit Tools." Note that PowerShell is much more comprehensive in this regard.

Furthermore, given the way the Windows component architecture works, it's possible to do strange things like call functions in .DLL's to do things. A complete list of this is probably not possible unless you are terribly familiar with Windows internals.

ipconfig - display network interface IP address information

nslookup - perform DNS lookup

nbtstat - NetBIOS over TCP/IP utility

sc - commandl ine interface to control and configure services

reg - perform registry operations

netsh - perform configuration changes on network interfaces

route - display or change routing table (There's also an ipxroute command which works if you have NWLink installed)

schtasks - command line interface to Task Scheduler.

wevtutil - command line interface to Event Viewer.

getmac - displays MAC addresses of all interfaces.

devcon - command line interface to Plug and Play subsystem - think of it as a command line Device Manager.

fsutil - filesystem-related operations

chkdsk - check filesystem on a volume

ftp - command line ftp client

format - format a volume

label - change volume label

net - performs a wide variety of "server" type operations including drve mapping, service control, user management, etc.

powercfg - configure power related settings.

regsvr32 - register/unregister DLLs

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Microsoft has mostly eliminated Command Prompt information from the Help files distributed with Windows 7 and Vista, However, you can get the command-line reference list from the help documents of Windows Server family (or Windows XP).

Here's some online command-line reference lists from Microsoft technet sites.

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Run ntcmds.chm in command line.

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