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I have a table like the following :

                Choice 1      Choice 2      Choice 3  
Person A              3             2             1  
Person B              1             2             3  
Person C              1             3             2  
Person D              1             3             2  

etc.

where each individual has decided, among which one he preferred (number 1), its second best option (number 2) and its least preferred one (number 3).

I know i could generate a pie chart indirectly through the use of scores, but is there a direct way to create a pie chart in Excel to visualize which choice is most favored by the provided placements ?

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Can you please help clarify what exactly you're looking to visualize? Do you want a single chart that has all 12 values? Or 3 charts, one per choice? Or 4 charts, one per person? Also, pie charts specifically show parts of a whole (percentages), so you'll likely need to convert your ranking to a percentage to have the chart show properly. Perhaps another chart type (maybe column/bar) would be more appropriate? –  dav May 31 '12 at 11:28
    
Tough question : i am not fixed on a number of charts. The idea is to be able to generate an opinion as to which choice is most favored by voters. Any idea where i don't have to ponderate 1st choice with 2nd choice is welcome. –  Benoît Jun 1 '12 at 7:30

2 Answers 2

Here's a quick scaling method that's one step down from scoring, if you really don't want to go that far.

Quick scaling method.

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Interesting idea. I have to think about it. –  Benoît Jun 1 '12 at 7:32

The objective is a pie chart so visually, bigger means better. The scoring was "smaller means better". So the values need to be reversed. Lakovosian's solution does that but the results are not proportional to the scoring. There is a more direct approach that keeps everything proportional.

The scoring was 1 through 3, so the values can be reversed using 4-X. That gives a high score of 3 and a low score of 1. Then just sum up the reversed rankings. It isn't necessary to convert each entry. Basic algebra: if there are N people, the sum of the reversed rankings would be

    4N-SUM(rankings).  

This would give this result:

                    Choice 1      Choice 2      Choice 3  
    Person A              3             2             1  
    Person B              1             2             3  
    Person C              1             3             2  
    Person D              1             3             2  
    Sum                   6            10             8
    Reversed Sum         10             6             8
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