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I am using log-me-in Central to look after a few dozen computers. These computers are used both for home use and work use. When the computers are used for work, they should not be connected via wireless.

In the best case, I'd like to be able to use LogMeIn to prevents users on shift from connecting wirelessly.

Still acceptable would be to have the computer email me if it connects wirelessly.

If I knew how to set up a script that checks to see if the computer connected wirelessly and I could send an email, then I would be set.

UPDATE: Thanks for the responses. To answer the questions: the computers can be laptops or desktops, and they will be running some flavor of Windows (XP and up). Even if a different solution must be implemented for XP, Vista and Windows - that's OK. If information can be provided on any particular solution, fantastic! In terms of language, I'm looking for a solution that ideally doesn't require another install on the end user computers (e.g. .NET can't be guranteed to be on all computers), but if an install must be done, it must be done. The pain is worth it if I can solve the problem.

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What language[? –  Leandro Tupone Jun 6 '12 at 1:00
    
Take the WLAN cards out of the laptops (assuming these are laptops). –  ultrasawblade Jun 6 '12 at 3:13

2 Answers 2

What language do you want for this?

You can use the "devcon" utility for Windows 5 (XP) or you can use wmic for Windows 6 (Vista/Seven)

You can use .NET 2.0 and above, with the class NetworkInterface, or you can parse the output of a commandline like:

ipconfig /all

or

netstat -rs

Please edit your question and I will edit my answer accord to do you want to use.

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It really depends on language you want to write your program but BATCH scripts run on all windows systems.(You wanted windows?)

You can simply write a BATCH file that ping 8.8.8.8 and check the response using error level concept.

If the system is connected to INTERNET it will return reply.

now do what you like. (In linux it is much easier)

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