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I have Windows XP. How can I view all the IP addresses connected to a website such as google?

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closed as not a real question by Tom Wijsman, Renan, Journeyman Geek, Joe Taylor, Canadian Luke Jul 18 '12 at 21:44

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Do you mean on your network? Or general Google statistics? –  Hassan Jun 7 '12 at 11:19
    
I mean a web server. –  Nomin Jun 7 '12 at 11:24
    
You want a list of all IP addresses that are currently connected to any of Google's servers? –  Oliver Salzburg Jun 7 '12 at 12:52
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This isn't possible, unless you have access to the server('s) itself, as stated in the answers below. –  Adam Jun 8 '12 at 1:56
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2 Answers

if the web server is on your PC then you have a couple options

  • netstat -an will show a list of open poorts and connections to those ports
  • the IIS logs, if enabled, will show the IP of past connections and what actions they took
  • TCPView fron SysInternals will show live conenctions
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Thanks, but I mean a remote server. –  Nomin Jun 7 '12 at 11:34
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This isn't practical –  uSlackr Jun 8 '12 at 2:08
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In order to get this information, one of the following is required:

A. You need to be on the destination machine, and run software that is tracking and recording information about all incoming connections. This is more complex if the destination IP doesn't point to a single machine, but a very large cluster of machines such as that Google uses. You can totally expect Google to not help you with this without being law enforcement.

B. You need to be on a router immediately "in front" of the destination machine, and run software that is tracking and recording information about connections to the destination machine you are interested in. Such routers exist only in Google's datacenters. You can totally expect Google to not help you with this without being law enforcement.

C. You need to be on every intermediate router between every single possible ISP that could have a source machine you are interested in AND that can forward traffic to the destination machine, and run software that is tracking, recording, and coordinating this information about the destination machine you are interested in. You can totally expect all ISPs to not help you with this without being high-ranking international law enforcement and even then it is unlikely you could get all ISPs to cooperate.

D. You need to run software on every possible source machine that might make a connection to Google, and run software on your end that can collect, collate, and store this information. You also have integrity issues to worry about (i.e. did the user modify the information, etc.). This is just straight out impossible, if for no other reason every single hard drive ever made is probably not enough space to store the amount of information generated.

Without any of the above there is no way for you to get this information.

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