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I'm managing the Network of a small enterprise. A Linksys WAP54G v3.1 used to provide the WiFi network.

I was called, because the device did not provide a WiFi network anymore. I first of all tried to ping the device via LAN, but there was no reaction. I've frequently reconnected the AP to the mains and always the POWER and the LINK LED keep solid, even if no network cable is connected.

What I've done yet:

  1. Reset as documented: Pressed the RESET button for 10 seconds. After that I have tried to access the AP with a direct cable connection to my computer, that I've set to a static ip of 192.168.1.240, but i got no ping response on the default IP 192.168.1.245. Furthermore ipconfig reports "media disconnected".
  2. More complex reset method as described here http://bruceshankle.blogspot.de/2005/12/how-to-reset-linksys-wap54g.html
    as well had no effect. also tried to ping 192.168.1.1 without success
  3. Tried this method: http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/networking/threads/142437/linksys-wireless-access-point-problem#post680245
    but there was no ping response when powering up. As well the tftp transfer timed out
  4. Finally tried to short pin 15 and 16 of the flash chip on the bottom side of the AP mainboard while booting to provoke a Checksum error. This should lead to the possibility to upload a firmware with tftp, as the AP stops booting and waits for a tftp connection on 192.168.1.1. But I've had no success. As well i've put pin 15 and 16 to ground while booting, also without an effect.

After all that I still can't ping the AP, ipconfig still tells me "media disconnected". The POWER and LINK LED are solid.

I would appreciate your answers

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The functionality of the WAP54G can be replaced for less than US$10 nowadays. If you've already spent an hour on this problem, you've wasted more of your company's money in your own salary than the cost of replacing the device. Unless you're doing IT in a snow-bound research station in Antarctica, you should just walk down to the store and buy a new cheap wireless router. Buy two and keep a spare on hand. Your office probably pays more for toner cartridges, and they keep spares of those on hand. –  Spiff Jun 25 '12 at 7:14
    
I must admit, you're right. I have already installed a new one and it's working fine - so this is more of a private question. –  user142113 Jun 25 '12 at 8:51

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