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I am searching for a free software that runs on Windows 7 and that regularly read the SMART values from my local drives and saves them in a local database for visualization. Such a software would be really helpful for monitoring the different values, e.g. the Total Bytes Written (TBW) value of a SSD.

Doe anybody know such a software?

I know that smartmontools includes a deamon that can log SMART values. But AFAIR it only outputs text based info and has no database.

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What are you aiming to accomplish? Your OS is constantly monitoring it, and most SMART events are a one-time trigger when a value is exceeded. So they only change once (good to bad), and then stay in that state until the drive is replaced (or occasionally, repaired). –  Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 Jun 26 '12 at 19:44
    
Google did a huge study on SMART monitoring a while ago. Perhaps some information in their report would be useful, either for the information you're trying to get or ideas on how they accessed this information. –  jbarlow Jun 27 '12 at 6:48
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@techie007: I am not interested in the good/bad status. More important for me are the tendencies of some values and the absolute TBW value. –  Robert Jun 27 '12 at 7:26
    
You may have to make your own logging/charting system with a system of batch-files and SMART tools. I guess nobody has bothered to make an advanced SMART tool like this because it is assumed that SMART data isn’t reliable enough, making it of little use. Personally, I don’t care if it’s reliable or not, I just like the data, logs, and charts. :-) –  Synetech Jul 24 '12 at 1:37

3 Answers 3

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Surely you don't need to be constantly monitoring the SMART status? Periodic checking would be sufficient I would think. It's not like the output is that accurate for predicting failure anway - check out the Google report referenced by @jbarlow, also check what Steve Gibson has to say about SMART in his article "SMART is dumb".

If this is the case, why not run the smartmon tool periodically, run the text output through a script to capture the required output into a table - text-based might well be sufficient. Then use a spreadsheet to process the table.

You could further refine this so that the output was processed into a simple database such as sqlite. Any of the scripting languages would be able to do this - In order of personal preference: Node.js, PHP, Python, PERL. A 2nd script would periodically rifle through the database and produce an appropriate log - perhaps in HTML format with a suitable chart.

In fact, thinking further, if all you are interested in is how much data has been read/written in order to try and predict SSD failure, I'd run a periodic script (once a week would be more than enough), just capture the TBW and anything else needed and, if it is above a given threshold, write to syslog and raise a system or external mail alert.

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> If this is the case, why not run the smartmon tool periodically, run the text output through a script to capture the required output That's exactly what I have been doing (with SmartUDM) for years now. I have a folder full of timestamp-named files with all the SMART data of my drives. I don't do it as frequently anymore because it's a chore, but when I do, I (manually) compare the new file(s) to the previous one to see the "progress". I agree that an actual program would be much better. –  Synetech Jul 19 '12 at 22:00
    
@Synetech: You can, of course, get smartmontools for Windows so creating an AT job or better a Windows scheduler job to run once a week should be easy enough, just a simple batch file. The processing could be a separate job of course. I must admit though, it seems too much of a faff even for an endemic automator like me to be bothered with ;) Better to keep things backed up and enjoy the surprise shopping trip when things fail! ;) –  Julian Knight Jul 19 '12 at 22:07
    
@Synetech: Thanks for the edit. –  Julian Knight Jul 19 '12 at 22:09
    
Even if this is not the answer I was hoping for it is still the best answer... –  Robert Jul 24 '12 at 7:48

It's not completely free, but I've used ArgusMonitor for that purpose. Might do what you need. If not, try googling "argusmonitor free alternative graph" or somesuch.

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Does it really allow to monitor smart values for several months? The screen shots only show monitoring for the last minutes. –  Robert Jun 26 '12 at 18:51

I don't know of a product that logs the drive's history, but I do know of a product that does long-term monitoring of the health of the drive and gives alerts in real-time.

The product is HDDLife, which has three versions : freeware, commercial €20, commercial €22.

image

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> I do know of a product that does long-term monitoring of the health of the drive... HDDLife What is the long-term aspect? –  Synetech Jul 19 '12 at 22:02
    
@Synetech: It's not a utility I use, although it's well-referenced (more than 1 million on google). It's evident that it keeps a record of issues over time when computing the health or degradation of a disk. –  harrymc Jul 20 '12 at 5:32
    
> It's evident that it keeps a record of issues over time when computing the health or degradation of a disk. Not to me; all I can find is that it reads the current SMART data. –  Synetech Jul 20 '12 at 13:40
    
@Synetech: Yah, it's quite difficult to find any facts inside that commercial bla-bla. That is why I chose the screenshot above, where a new disk is being shown as somewhat unhealthy after only 3+ months. By my logic (which might be flawed) nothing else than high and sustained temperatures or high sector-failure rate (even if mapped to spare sectors) can cause such a prognostic. –  harrymc Jul 20 '12 at 17:19
    
Yes, but it is still reading the current SMART data; there is nothing historical or long-term about it, so it is no different than any other SMART-capable program. –  Synetech Jul 20 '12 at 17:37

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