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I use firefox (under Linux/Ubuntu) with a lot of anti-ad extension, like adblock, NoScript, Ghosty etc.

I found this IP 220.191.158.69 always in the list of NoScript, I want to ban this IP. I have checked it, searched it. It is from China telecom damn Ad.

I guess NoScript can ban this IP already, but When I do not allow that IP, sometimes a webpage can not be loaded at first time, I need to refresh two or more times. I hate it...

So I hope there are some way or browser extensions or script can jump through this damn IP.

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> When I do not allow that IP, sometimes a webpage can not be loaded at first time, I need to refresh two or more times. I hate it... What might be happening is that the page is trying to load a file from the ad server, so when you block it, the page has trouble loading. You could try using an IP blocker like PeerBlock to block all connections to the IP altogether. –  Synetech Jun 28 '12 at 1:14
    
In future, PLEASE include your OS/Distro and other relevant information in the question. –  Journeyman Geek Jun 28 '12 at 2:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's probably a GUI for it in your distro, but i believe its a simple matter of adding a firewall rule - something like /sbin/iptables -I INPUT -s 10.10.10.10 -j DROP should do the trick - you can see more examples on howtogeek. I believe you need to save the firewall rules as well but thats fairly distro specific.

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OK... try this

Edit your hosts file ( exists in win and ux os's ) In windows is usually at %windir%\system32\drivers\etc

add the following text at the end of the file

    220.191.158.69        localhost

save it... reboot to be more sure... and try problematic pages.

Please gave feed back of success or no-success of this solution! ;-)

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I'm using Linux, I add this line into /etc/hosts file, but this does not work. (I rebooted my system) –  NagatoPain Jun 28 '12 at 2:11
    
hosts only works for domain names - it just overrides DNS, so won't work here. –  Journeyman Geek Jun 28 '12 at 2:25

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