Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

I use Drupal, and instead of having to use the formal interface to make small changes to a site all the time, I am wondering if there is a way to determine what modifications Drupal makes to the database so that I can make them manually the next time.

For example, if I use Drupal’s interface to add a module to the site, I would like to be able to find out what database entries it changes/adds so that if I want to add another module, I can add or change the file or database entry myself instead of having to go through Druapl.

This way, I can have better control over the system as well as gain a greater understanding of how it works underneath.

My environment is Windows XP, MySQL latest stable, phpmyadmin.

share|improve this question
1  
Why not just use an actual RCS? – Synetech Jul 1 '12 at 1:45
    
@Synetech My immediate answer is that I need to look it up. – Wolfpack'08 Jul 1 '12 at 1:47
    
To look what up; the modifications? – Synetech Jul 1 '12 at 1:48
    
@Synetech I guess I need to try some RCS's and see which one works out. The purpose isn't for the revisions but for the information, of course. – Wolfpack'08 Jul 1 '12 at 1:49
1  
You can use the Log Files tab of the Startup Variables section of MySQL Administrator or you can just edit your my.ini file and set the log entries: log="…/query.log", general-log=1, general-log-file="…/query.log" (which is good because you also get to see the full annotations for the settings as well as other settings). – Synetech Jul 2 '12 at 7:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Enable the Devel node access extension of the Devel module

share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what I was looking for, man. Thank you. It works great. – Wolfpack'08 Nov 4 '12 at 0:14

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .