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My Windows 7 Professional PC is connected to a MacOSX Server, using the same credentials as for my workstation. I can successfully assign a network drive letter an I am able to access the server by typing \\MACSERVER\ in the address bar of windows explorer (I can also access the server by typing that into the Speed Commander Shell bar).

However, I can't connect to the server by typing \\MACSERVER\ in the Windows CLI. I get a "The network path was not found" message.

When I type \\MACSERVER\work\, which is an existing folder, I get a message saying "access denied".

When I try to expand the network folder in the Windows Explorer I also don't see the server, just the name of my workstation.

Does anyone know, how I can access that network path through the shell? I need it for a PowerShell script.

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Oh sorry, I saw this could be a duplicate of that question. But the question and answers there don't really solve this problem as it was a very special problem of the OP. –  acme Jul 2 '12 at 12:11
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\\MACSERVER\ is really not a valid UNC path, because it's supposed to be \\SERVER\SHARE; the Windows explorer just does a bit of magic and checks if you've typed in a server name, and shows all of the directories it's sharing. Are you running the shell 'As Administrator'? –  SpellingD Jul 19 '12 at 15:51
    
No, but you were right about the share - I had to add a share on the mac to make it accessible this way. I didn't had in mind that you can't just connect to the server and show all of it's subdirs as it seemed at first glance. –  acme Jul 20 '12 at 11:44

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I had to add a share on the mac to make it accessible this way. I didn't had in mind that you can't just connect to the server and show all of it's subdirs like in a regular folder as it seemed at first glance.

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