Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a similar problem to that answered in This Question however, since I need to do this to a large number of directories and sub directories I was wondering if anyone knew of a way to cascade the permissions down from root to file levels. Thanks

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Click on the start button and then type cmd now right click on the cmd appear in the list and run it as ADMIN using the option Run as Administrator. Or you can use the shortcut key after typing the cmd press the Ctrl+Shift+Enter. Now typr the following command

takeown /f (foldername) /r /d y

If the operation was successful, you should see the following message:

SUCCESS: The file (or folder): "foldername" now owned by user "Computer Name\User name".

Then to assign the Administrators group Full Control Permissions for the file, you may use the ICACLS command. Use this syntax:

icacls (foldername) /grant administrators:F /T

The /T parameter is added so that the operation is carried out through all the sub-directories and files within that folder.

For more help you can read this article for vista.

share|improve this answer

The command line programs takeown.exe, icacls.exe and cacls.exe can do what you want. As you don't say exactly what you need to do the concrete command line parameters are difficult to forsee.

The following questions may also help you:

share|improve this answer
    
cacls now called icacls in Windows. –  avirk Jul 2 '12 at 17:37
    
Thanks for the hint, updated my answer. Anyway cacls.exe is also still part of every Win7 installation. –  Robert Jul 2 '12 at 17:41
    
Yes but when you type it then command line will warn you as I've experienced :) –  avirk Jul 2 '12 at 17:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.