Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was running a m1.small instance ec2 ubuntu instance. I was running out of disk space, so I upgraded my instance to medium. When I upgraded I actually got 429.5 GB of space and after that I added 10 gb of volume too. When I run the "sudo fdisk -l" command I got this results.

Disk /dev/sda1: 8589 MB, 8589934592 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1044 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/sda1 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/sda2: 429.5 GB, 429461078016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 52212 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/sda2 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/sdf: 10.7 GB, 10737418240 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1305 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

sda1 is the primary parition and sda2 is what I got added upgrading my system to medium.

But the problem persists, I am not able to pull the code from git, it is giving me this error.

remote: Counting objects: 409, done.
remote: Compressing objects: 100% (236/236), done.
fatal: write error: No space left on device
fatal: index-pack failed
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

It is normal and expected that partitions themselves (sda1 and sda2) do not contain valid partitions tables inside.

If you are using LVM, you could use vgadd to add sda2 to your volume group, then use lvextend to extend the logical volume, then whatever appropriate tool is relevant for the filesystem you chose (resize2fs for ext2/3/4).

Without LVM, you could delete sda2, then increase the size of sda1 with fdisk(delete and recreate it, being very careful to use the same start location), then use the relevant filesystem resize tool.

Claiming sdf with LVM is the same process. Without LVM you'll have to mount it at a separate location to make use of it.

share|improve this answer
    
hi @bofh I am using ubuntu ec2 instance, I dont think so I can use any LVM's. I am not sure about this –  Jeevan Dongre Jul 3 '12 at 9:33
    
I felt its quite complicated. –  Jeevan Dongre Jul 3 '12 at 13:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.