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We've recently setup a new domain on our office network and joined all laptops to it. When I log onto Windows 7 while plugged into the network, I pass the logon screen and the Welcome screen within seconds (I have a SSD). When I'm on wireless at home or elsewhere (not on the domain network), it takes forever to get past the Welcome screen. This also happens to everyone at work in the same scenario. We believe it might be a DNS issue. Anyone have any ideas of how to diagnose the issue?

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Do you map persistent drive letters to a file server in the domain? Or other wise refer to directories in the domain which are not available when not at work and thus causing timeouts? –  Hennes Jul 7 '12 at 16:30
    
Yes! We have two network drives mapped via a login batch script on our domain. One is referenced by a local internal IP (e.g. 192.168.1.xxx) and another by a local hostname in our local DNS (e.g. DEV01). Can I do something in my hosts file or somewhere on my machine to have those either timeout or skip if not on the domain? –  Mark Jul 8 '12 at 23:54
    
Well, if it is persistent (and thus still mapped when the machine is not on the domain) and windows tries to access it then you will get timeouts. DNS is an obvious place, but even if the IP is caches in the local DNS resolver or if you use a hosts file then windows still can't access the share. -- What happens if you disconnected the drives (e.g. via right click via explorer), take the laptop off the domain (e.g. unplug the network/wireless) and reboot? Thus rebooting without login script and without leftover drives? –  Hennes Jul 9 '12 at 14:00
    
Just tried it and it appears to still be slow. I manually disconnected mapped drives, I turned my wifi off and unplugged my Cat 5, rebooted and it still about 15-20 seconds to get past the Welcome screen. Is it possible something is cached at another level? BIOS? Any other ideas? –  Mark Jul 9 '12 at 14:53
    
Not at the BIOS. Wild guess 1: Any programs installed from the network working paths still pointing to the network? Wild guess 2: One delay (network) now replaced by timeout on DHCP ack? Wild guess 3: Do you start any programs automatically (e.g. via the start up folder) which can refer to the work network? –  Hennes Jul 9 '12 at 15:48

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