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I am making an inventory for software at my workplace, I am having trouble figuring out the various versions of Windows Server OSes.

Microsoft Windows Server 2003 R2 x64 Edition Service Pack 2 - Is this Enterprise Edition or does having no specific edition mentioned mean that its Standard Edition?

Microsoft Windows Server 2003 R2 Standard Edition (Windows Rights Management Services 1.0) - - this one doesn't mention the hardware architecture, does it mean that its 32Bit/x86?

Any help or pointers on this are much appreciated.

Thanks

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Where are you getting this information from? When running the OS or from the label on the installation DVD/CD? –  iglvzx Jul 9 '12 at 6:12
    
@iglvzx - I am reading it off the label on the installation DVD/CD. Is there some kind of a convention that if the default version is Standard, Default arch is x86 and the default SP is none? –  VIcky Jul 9 '12 at 6:28

1 Answer 1

If you want to do it by hand, right click My Computer -> Properties

It should list the server and specs on the "General" tab, like this:

enter image description here

If there are a lot of servers I would look into writing a script or using something like Spiceworks to automatically inventory those attributes for you.

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I have a bunch of CD/DVDs from which I am trying to figure out which is which. Some of these are unused, so there is no Physical Server to verify the version from. –  VIcky Jul 10 '12 at 3:48
    
I apparently wasn't aware that you didn't actually have access to the server. I don't believe know of a way to determine the OS based on the product key so you may just have to boot the installer and check each one individually. –  jmreicha Jul 10 '12 at 16:55

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