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I'd like to encrypt my Windows system partition with TrueCrypt on my new notebook. It's using an SSD and supports Intel Rapid Start technology. As far as I've understood it, the computer only goes into S3 sleep and after a while, the BIOS will swap the active part of the RAM out to a separate partition on the SSD disk and turn off the power completely. When waking up, the BIOS can quickly restore the RAM from that partition and Windows then wakes up from suspend-to-RAM (S3) as usual.

Now if I encrypt my system partition, in sleep mode, some RAM contents can be placed on that separate partition. I guess this will be unencrypted. Is there anything to consider about the overall encryption security, or are there any known recommendations about using the combination of TrueCrypt system encryption and Intel Rapid Start?

Also, I've noticed that I have the option to encrypt only the Windows system partition or the entire disk. How could TrueCrypt encryption affect the Rapid Start partition, does it even work at all? (When going to sleep, the Intel driver maybe could use encryption to store the data, but when resuming, can the data be decrypted?)

The Windows version is 7 Ultimate. I've tried to use Windows' own hibernation, only to see whether Rapid Start really brings a performance advantage, but it seems I don't even have that option. Trying to enable hibernate brings the error message that my system firmware would not support that. So the only option to suspend to disk that I have is Rapid Start.

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Now if I encrypt my system partition, in sleep mode, some RAM contents can be placed on that separate partition. I guess this will be unencrypted.

Even if this is true, the only way to acces the information is to log into the user account, which would then require password to the account. Do you have any evidence that makes you believe this?

Also, I've noticed that I have the option to encrypt only the Windows system partition or the entire disk. How could TrueCrypt encryption affect the Rapid Start partition, does it even work at all? (When going to sleep, the Intel driver maybe could use encryption to store the data, but when resuming, can the data be decrypted?)

If you are going to use encryption on a SSD you should encrypt the ENTIRE device. Otherwise TrueCrypt and any encryption to be honest cannot guarantee that data once moved to automatically by the firmware can't be later recovered using low level tools. If the entire drive is encrypted this even if the data is moved it will be encrypted.

The Windows version is 7 Ultimate. I've tried to use Windows' own hibernation, only to see whether Rapid Start really brings a performance advantage, but it seems I don't even have that option. Trying to enable hibernate brings the error message that my system firmware would not support that. So the only option to suspend to disk that I have is Rapid Start.

I find it hard to believe your hardware does not support being placed into hibernation. Hardware being sold since Windows XP has supported this functionality.

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I know that SSDs use wear levelling and move old versions of data around. But to access such information, you need to disassemble the SSD and access the raw flash memory. My security needs are not so big to cover that scenario. Also, my notebook is a Samsung 900X4C. You may well get one yourself and try, if you like. Even before installing Rapid Start software on an otherwise clean Windows installation, hibernate cannot be activated. I guess it must be some BIOS (UEFI) setting that Windows is regarding here. –  LonelyPixel Jul 12 '12 at 9:00
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