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Wanted solution:
[internet]---[3G USB modem]---[Windows7]---[WLAN]

I have a Huawei E367 modem that is connected to a Win7 machine's USB port. This works alright. (except huawei's love for intermittent stops)

Now I want to share my internet connection from the 3G USB via WLAN.

On controlpanel->networkandinternet->networkconnections I see LAN, WLAN, bluetooth and 3G.
I can bridge LAN/WLAN but not anything 3G. (or bluetooth for that matter)
On 3G->properties->sharing I can set up a share of sorts but that is computer-to-computer and not a "normal" wlan so that is not usable for me for other reasons.

Is there a way around this (except buying a 3G router)? A setting I haven't found, a program that does it, updating to Win8, linix live CD or antyhing that doesn't involve placing the 3GUSBmodem a place the sun doesn't shine very close to the developers of the thing? The latter wouldn't solve my problem but would give me a temporary feeling of satisfaction.

Update Rereading this QA I see that the solution was a bit hard to find as a comment to an answer. I went with virtualrouter and it worked without a problem. It is F/OSS so please keep hacking.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm struggling with approx. the same issue. I dont think the term Bridging is right here, its another pure network term defined years back. Instead, I believe you want to have your PC (or Laptop) with 3G Internet (Modem Broadband) access (also known as Wide Wide Area Network or WWAN) to act as a WiFi Access Node (either permanent or temporary). This is treated in several (and its growing) places like here: http://www.itgeekdiary.com/windows-7-as-an-wi-fi-access-point/ or here: Internet connection sharing over WIFI without modifying LAN adapter IP address

In the first link ressource, its described that "..Some wireless broadband providers’ hardware disallows the use of their device in an ICS setup. Microsoft are working on a solution to support all of these and will make an announcement when we have a resolution."

I guess this is what we have to wait for, unless you decide to move to another platform like *n*ix type of OS. Some refers to programs that promise this functionality like this overview site: http://alternativeto.net/software/connectify/ but they can't beat the hardware or driver limitations set by vendors like Huawei. I have a qualified guess that European Union (or Commission) will look into this sort of matter as a protective measure for keeping competitors away, and thus will file a case against these vendors in due time. Hope this gave some comfort even the solution isn't just around the corner... Cheers

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Much appreciated. Besides writing Really Bad drivers (as mentioned in this old article: selfelected.com/3-3g-and-flash-10 ) the 3G dongle manufacturers (only 2 or more?) are stopping ICS. I have learned that the telecom companies in USA are actively stopping sharing of 3G through phones. Unfortunately it wears off here in Europe too where the telecom operators have less power and the phone manufacturers more (compared to the us). –  LosManos Aug 21 '12 at 14:18
    
I went for virtualrouter.codeplex.com because it is open source and was high up on the alternativeto-list (whatever that means). So far it does the job. –  LosManos Aug 26 '12 at 10:34

From what I have tried and learned, the only option for sharing a connection as such is via ICS ("Internet Connection Sharing"). When you enable ICS for the 3G connection (which is treated as a "modem" and not as a "high speed connection") it automatically assigns another LAN connection as the sharer of the 3G connection (when available, and if there are more than 2 available network connections, I believe you have to choose which one shares the 3G).

Anyway, a static IP is assigned to the sharer connection, and the computer will begin to act as a DHCP server for any other devices on that connection. (Make sure to disable or disconnect any other DHCP devices, as such would be when connecting to a router instead of a switch. Or you could just plug into the WAN port of a wireless router.) If using Ad Hoc, make sure to create an Ad Hoc wifi network before sharing the 3G connection, and then when you share, select the Ad Hoc network as your sharer.

Unfortunately, Windows 7 will not bridge a high-speed connection with a 3G connection (or with any other "modem" type connection, for that matter). Please let me know if this helps. I just figured it out the hard way! :(

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As I guessed. I can't declare this as the Answer though; since it is hard to prove that something doesn't exist by not finding it. –  LosManos Aug 21 '12 at 14:14
1  
Regarding the existing answers and comments at the time of this posting, the only way to do this in Windows 7 is by use of proprietary software, preferably one that creates a virtual broadband network connection through which the 3G data is piped. This virtual connection could then be bridged to your LAN adapter in Windows 7 (the actual term is "network connection bridging"). There is no native support other than ICS, which is limited, troublesome, and proprietary (I believe). I would like to try the link posted by Peter Rosenberg. Hopefully, it provides the solution. –  Slink Aug 22 '12 at 15:55

How to Setup a Wi-Fi HotSpot in Windows 8

This is the best solution. I used it on Windows 7. You should also create the batch file he mentions at the end of the article, if you want to autostart the Wi-Fi. This has worked brilliant for me.

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You should just post links. Sites you link to this may disappear and then the link is not good for anyhting. –  user 99572 is fine Mar 9 '13 at 15:25

Ive actually bridged my home cable modem connection with my Android modem 3g connection. It lowered my speeds though.

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Hello, and welcome to Super User. Please take a moment to review the guidelines for answers (How to Answer) and you will understand why your answer has garnered negative feedback (aka downvotes). This is a Q&A site, meaning all answers should try to provide a complete and accurate solution to the problem or question asked. Your answer, to be useful to the asker, should explain how you to do what you did. –  kopischke Jan 28 '13 at 10:49

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