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My desktop runs Windows 7 64-bit Enterprise. When connecting to my desktop via RDP from various other Windows 7 clients, the first connection after resuming the desktop from sleep is slow.

To help explain it another way, here's a timeline of what happens:

  1. Put desktop to sleep
  2. Wake desktop
  3. Connect to desktop via RDP. Connection will be slow (screen often won't finish updating, screen is partially black, very slow mouse clicks/typing)
  4. Disconnect RDP session
  5. Reconnect using exact same settings, this time RDP will be nice and snappy. Any subsequent connections (until the desktop is put to sleep) will be fast as well.

This issue persists despite changing various settings such as color bit-depth, screen size, font smoothing, desktop composition, etc. The issue is present both over the internet and locally over a gigabit network. There are never any error messages in either the host or the client. This issue is repeatable 100% of the time using the steps posted above. All of the latest Windows/Microsoft updates as of the time of this writing are applied. I have not tested using an older version of Windows as the client, only Windows 7.

This is a goofy issue that I have no clue how to track down, without some kind of error message or anything to go on.

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This is really strange. The only idea I have is the "Wake process" is somehow interupped when the machine is woke up by RDP. Could you maybe try to change a settings a little bit (e.g. do not put HDs to sleep, no GPU sleep etc.) and retry. Maybe this way it is possible to find the one settings that is breaking. My best guess would be the power saving settings of the GPU. –  TeX HeX Aug 10 '12 at 18:29
    
I'll take a look at the various sleep settings on hardware devices. It may be worth noting that the issue seems to be the same no matter how I wake the desktop - either by wiggling the mouse or by a Wake-on-Lan packet. –  iridris Aug 10 '12 at 18:56

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