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I am trying to open a file in a new tab in an already running console Vim session. This functionality is available in gVim via the --remote-tab-silent option.

If this is not possible, is there a work around?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you have Vim compiled with +clientserver, and you run Cygwin's X server, and you invoke console Vim with a --servername argument, then yes. See:

:help clientserver
:help --servername

Example:

vim --servername vim
vim --remote-tab-silent foo

When you install Cygwin's version of gVim, it should create a symbolic link from /bin/vim to /usr/bin/gvim, which means you will have +clientserver and you can use this functionality in console vim.

The reason the X server is required is that "Unix" variants of Vim use X's security protocols and interprocess communication to implement the +clientserver features. The question is whether you want to have to run Cygwin's X server just to get this functionality.

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1  
Incidentally, I prefer to start Cygwin's X server with the -internalwm argument, which prevents X from running in a window where X clients display; instead, the X clients are handled by Windows' directly. – Heptite Aug 11 '12 at 20:47
    
Thank you for your answer. I am curious how you figured this one out? – Forethinker Aug 12 '12 at 5:51
1  
It's not a simple explanation, but part of it is that I follow the Vim developers' mailing list, so I was aware that console Vim could become a server provided an X server was available and the --servername argument was provided on invocation. It wasn't a stretch to assume that it'd basically be the same under Cygwin as long as Cygwin's X server was available. – Heptite Aug 12 '12 at 5:55

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