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This may be a really dumb question for you guys, but I live in the country and the only internet access I have is on my smart phone, understand I'm not trying to access the internet using my smartphone, but what I would like to do is have my smart phone talk to my computer, and WiFi tv without cables, I have minor networking knowledge, I have been successful in setting up a ADHOC network between the two Xbox 360s in the house so that my kids and I can play against each other but would like to expand my (for lack of a better term ) "in house network ", any help would be really appreciated.

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A wireless router would be a good start –  Simon Sheehan Aug 14 '12 at 4:13
    
What else ? And what kinda settings should be looking at on the devices, just the norm ? , ssid will I need to assign an ip for each device or will it do it for me –  Chris Aug 14 '12 at 4:17
    
Most routers will automatically assign IP addresses to new connecting devices –  Robotnik Aug 14 '12 at 4:38

3 Answers 3

There shouldn't be any problem - it's the same as if you had an internet connection that failed. If devices can do anything locally, they should be able to do everything they need to locally if connected to the router.

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tl;dr Version: It should work fine.

Long Version:

Remember that the 'thing' (technical term) that connects to the internet is a modem. When setting up a network, you use a router to connect all the devices together. The modem is "just another device" on the network, with the specific task of MO-dulating and DEM-odulating internet signals. (Allowing you to access the internet)

You can get routers that 'hardwire' the connection between the modem and router. These are known as Modem/Routers (because they perform both tasks).

Whether you have a plain-old router or a modem/router combo, the local network connection will work fine.

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Each of those devices will connect to your local network without issue, provided your router has DHCP turned on (which is the default setting for every wireless router I've ever seen)?

Just be warned that the TV may not do anything useful on your network. I have only a small amount of experience with different Smart Tvs, but to me it appea that they connect directly to the internet for services. If your Tv's software is able to steam from a local source (eg. Streaming videos from another computer on the network), then you're in great shape.

It is also possible to set up your network so that you can tether your cell phone and actually access the Internet from your Tv, but this is a reasonably advanced task, and I think your performance would be terrible.

To answer your immediate question, though, pretend your smartphone and computer are both connected to the wireless router (or the computer is wired into the router because both are in the same room - it doesn't matter). Your router's DHCP server will automatically assign a unique IP address to both devices. Let's say your phone is assigned the address of 192.168.1.50 and your computer gets 192.168.1.51.

If you were to open a command shell (CMD/command prompt in Windows, Terminal on a Mac), you can test this by issuing the following command:

ping 192.168.1.50

If that's the right address for your phone, you should get a result telling you how long the round trip to talk to your phone took. It's measured in milliseconds. On a home wireless network, you'll see something like 60ms.

If that was successful, congratulations - you've confirmed your devices are talking together. Now you just have to setup your software on each of the 3 devices to talk to one another. That depends on what device models you have and what you're trying to accomplish.

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