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On Windows 7 everything we must do to set

"Process Priority"(to Low \ Below Normal \ Normal \ Above Normal \ High \ Realtime)

or to set

"Process Affinity"(to choose wich processor core would run on specifc process)

was opening Windows Task Manager, click on "Processes", right-click on a process and both options were showed and avaiable to easily set:

enter image description here

Nowadays, with Windows 8 I can't find it anymore...

  1. Is this still avaiable?
  2. If so, how could I do that?
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2 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Yes, it is still avaiable, but you can't access these configurations as the same way we did in the past(with Windows 7). It is still acessible via Windows 8 Task Manager , but not on the same place(on Processes tab).

Now, first of all, after opening the Task Manager(with Ctrl+Shift+Esc) you must click on "More Details" to see details of the running tasks:

enter image description here

Then you must go to the "Details" tab(and not to the "Processes" anymore as we usually did on windows 7). After that, right-click on the process "Name" that you want to set priority or affinity, then go to "Set Priority" or "Set Affinity" and set it as you may want:

enter image description here

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You can still use Process Explorer to control priority and affinity:

enter image description here

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That is not part of windows though (unless that changed as well) –  soandos Aug 16 '12 at 14:51
    
@soandos: That is correct. It's still a third-party tool which is not included with Windows 8 (at least to my understanding). –  Oliver Salzburg Aug 16 '12 at 15:03
    
@soandos - While not included with Windows its still written by Microsoft. –  Ramhound May 12 '13 at 8:57
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protected by Diogo Oct 25 '13 at 13:15

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